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''Artisan, small craft distilling is making an international comeback after many decades of large distillery production with limited brands and beverage experiences. A new generation of distillers with diverse, high quality products is emerging.

The Artisan Distilling Program was established over 15 years ago at Michigan State University by Prof. Kris A. Berglund.

The Artisan Distilling Program provides information, research, and training for those either in the artisan distilling business or interested in entering it. In this website, you will find basic information on the field of artisan distilling and a calendar of distilling related events, including our widely-known Artisan Distilling Workshop. ''

More, detailed information regarding MSU Artisan Distilling Program will be found here: www.artisandistilling.org

 

Contact:

Kris Arvid Berglund, Ph.D.

University Distinguished Professor of Food Science and Chemical Engineering

Director, MSU Artisan Distilling Program

2000 Merritt Road

East Lansing, MI  48823

ph: 517 974-3030

 

Research Mission Statement: The Muscle Foods Group will integrate teaching, research and extension to advance science and technology in the food and animal industry.

MSU Meats Laboratory Capabilities:

  • 18,000 square feet for red meat and poultry slaughter and processing15,000 square feet for personnel
    • Abbatoirs designed for slaughter of all major red meat and poultry species
    • Curing and cooking facilities
    • Refrigeration facilities for chilling, cutting and further processing
    • Sausage kitchen
      • All major processing scaled down for test size meat formulations
      • Refrigerated curing rooms
      • Smokehouse with natural and liquid smoke applications
    • Cooking equipment including steam jacketed kettle, microwave and clamshell grill
    • 5,000 square feet dedicated to two classrooms which have full access to carcasses and meat from the laboratory

      • Three research laboratories and support facilities focused on understanding and improving meat chemistry, muscle growth, meat quality and meat microbiology.

Specific Equipment:

For companies interested in utilizing the MSU Meat Laboratory Pilot Plant, please contact:

The Meat Lab

1358 Anthony Hall

(517) 353-9773

 

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The meat laboratory provides an opportunity for student employment and further experience in the meat processing industry. Student employees have the opportunity to work with almost all aspects of production from slaughter to further processing. As their experience increases, so do the opportunities. Every student gets a different experience based on their interests and skills.

For information on employment, fill out the application form and deliver it to:

Jennifer Dominguez
Meat Lab Manager
MSU Meat Laboratory office
Anthony Hall 
474 S Shaw Lane, Room 1358
East Lansing, MI 48824

Michigan State has a long history of their meat judging program.

Organized through the American Meat Science Association, Michigan State competes in five contests each year. These include:

Southeastern Meat Judging Contest, The Ohio State University and University of Kentucky

Eastern National Meat Judging Contest, Wyalusing, PA

American Royal Meat Judging Contest, Omaha, NE

High Plains Meat Judging Contest, Hereford, TX

International Meat Judging Contest, Dakota City, NE

Each contest consists of placing classes, reasons, quality and yield grading, and specifications. Team members learn evaluation skills and writing skills in addition to how to quality and yield grade beef carcasses. All of these skills are valuable to employers for future careers. All the while, participation in the meat judging program grows a person’s networking and allows them to be better leaders and teachers in school activities, careers and the community.

2012 Meat Judging Team

2012 MJ Team

(L to R) Coach: Sarah Wells, Team: Emily Mitchell, Patrick Owens, Andrew Weaver, Lane Carpenter, Kelsey Steketee Audrey Ing, Julie Feldpausch, Molly O’Brien

Spring Result

Southeastern: 4th overall, Weaver – 2nd individual overall, Ing – 4th individual overall

 

Fall Results

Eastern National: 8th overall

American Royal: 7th overall, Ing – 7th individual overall

High Plains: 3rd overall, Carpenter – 4th individual overall

International: 4th overall, Steketee – 9th individual overall

 

2013 Meat Judging Team

 Spring Result

Southeastern: 4th overall, Adams – 2nd individual overall, Bronkema – 4th individual overall

 

Fall Results

Eastern National: 10th overall

American Royal: 7th overall, Bronkema – 2nd individual overall

High Plains: 6th overall, Bronkema – tied for 8th individual overall

International: 8th overall

 MSU_MJT_Contest_History.xlsx

 

 

 

Products Available:

Product availability will vary with the time of year and the needs of the university. Please contact the Meat Lab staff or visit the Meat Lab in Anthony Hall for the current list of products and prices.

To see images of many of our products, visit our Facebook Page:

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Beef

Beef is sold by the side. Each side weighs approximately 350 pounds before processing. Orders are processed to the customer’s desire. Please contact Meat Lab management for beef side orders.

Food Safety:

At MSU, all animals are slaughtered under USDA inspection allowing the lab to sell product under the USDA Retail Exempt classification. USDA inspection requires HACCP plans to be in place and followed for slaughter.  

Meat is kept in refrigerated environments and time is monitored when meat products must be taken into classrooms for instruction. All students coming in the proximity of the products or handling the meat are required to wear hair nets and gloves. In classes with more hands-on instruction, aprons are worn as well. Any meat used for classroom instruction is inspected by Meat Lab personnel prior to being further processed, packaged and sold. Food safety is always a top priority. Any meat suspected of being exposed to temperature abuse or improper handling is not sold.  

Often, the meat laboratory slaughters animals to collect samples and data. The meat lab also provides raw materials for meat-related studies. If there is ever a situation where the animal or meat has been exposed to anything that makes them unsafe for consumption, product is incinerated or otherwise prevented from enter the food system. Precise records are kept on all animals entering the facility.

The Michigan State University Meat Laboratory is committed to serving the needs of the university while maintaining the highest food safety standards to ensure a safe product is available to the consumer.

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Livestock:

All meat sold through the MSU Meat Lab originated at the university farms south of campus. Beef comes from both the Beef Feedlot Teaching and Research Center and the Dairy Teaching and Research Farm. Lamb comes from the Sheep Teaching and Research Farm and Pork is from swine raised at the Swine Teaching and Research Farm. When you purchase meat, you are truly buying “Spartan” meat.  Read more about the University farms at each of their sites.

Beef: http://www.spartanbeef.com/

Sheep: http://www.ans.msu.edu/facilities/sheep_teaching_research_center

Swine: http://www.ans.msu.edu/facilities/swine_teaching_research_center

 

For more informationon Meat Lab products and to place an order, please contact:

Jennifer Dominguez

Meat Lab Manager

1358 Anthony Hall

East Lansing, MI 48824-1224

Phone: (517) 353-9773

Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

 

 

Several courses are offered in the area of meat science through both the Department of Animal Science and the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition.  Check the Schedule of Courses for offerings, times, and the official descriptions.

ANS 201 - Animal Products, 3 credits - In this course, students develop an understanding of food safety, processing, distribution, and the use of meat, milk, and eggs in manufactured products.  Not open to freshmen.

ANS 201L - Animal Products Laboratory, 1 credit—Students apply many of the objectives of the ANS 201 lecture, leaning how to use meat lab equipment, make a variety of sausages, break down carcasses, and make dairy products.

FSC 433 - Food Processing: Muscle Foods, 3 credits - A more in-depth study of manufacturing practices, product formulation, and quality control of fresh, frozen, and cured meats and fish.  Not open to freshmen or sophomores.

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Renovated from 1998 to 2005, the Michigan State University Meat Laboratory offers teaching, research and extension opportunities in a state-of-the-art facility. This 67,000 square foot facility is located in Anthony Hall and is managed by the Department of Animal Science and the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition.  The Meat Laboratory meets academic needs of the University in addition to producing product for retail sales.

Mission Statement of MSU Meat Laboratory

To provide opportunities for advancement of the meat industry through research and education''

Goals

  1. To allow stuents to have hands on learning experiences and better prepare them for careers in the industry.
  2. To provide opportunities for the livestock producer, meat processsor, and consumer to gain knowledge and resources to improve their operations.
  3. To be a support system for research in agriculture and other related fields at MSU.

Functions of the MSU Meat Laboratory

Education
The Meat Lab provides carcasses and cuts for class instruction.  Students are taught how to break down beef, pork, and lamb carcasses in addition to learning to make processed meat products.  List of courses offered.

Research
The facility provides meat for research projects or harvests livestock to collect carcass data and samples for animal studies in areas such as nutrition and genetics.

Outreach/Extension
Meat Extension Specialists and Educators utilize the MSU Meat Laboratory to provide training for meat processors, livestock producers, consumers, and youth throughout the state.

Meat Judging

The Meat Lab provides carcasses and cuts for the Meat Judging Team. Students have the opportunity to learn how to Quality and Yield Grade carcasses based on USDA standards. They also learn how to evaluate cuts of meat to identify if they have been cut according to specifications. All of these skills are directly applicable to future careers in the meat industry. Read more about the Meat Judging Program and our Meat Judging Team, here.

There are two dental schools in Michigan, one at the University of Detroit Mercy, the other at the University of Michigan.  The Pre-Dental Curriculum Guide is a printable chart showing the prerequisite courses needed to apply to each of the Michigan dental schools.  Other helpful information about the in-state dental programs is shown below, and the links at the bottom can be used to research requirements of out-of-state dental programs.

Additional Recommended Pre-Dental Courses

University of Detroit Mercy (UDM) - In addition the the prerequisites listed in the Pre-Dental Curriculum Guide, the following are recommended courses:  Upper level biological sciences such as comparative anatomy, physiology, molecular genetics, histology, embryology, and virology; behavioral science; communication; medical ehtics; and business courses, such as marketing.  UDM emphasizes rigor—a full-time load, at a 4-year college/university, with several science courses each semester.
University of Michigan (UM) - In addition to the listed prerequisites, UM suggests upper-level biological science courses, such as anatomy, histology, physiology; public speaking; and art.

Other Activities/Experiences

It is expected that candidates will exhibit a confirmed interest and motivation in a dental career by participating in career-related activities such as job shadowing, community service and other volunteer opportunities.
UDM - One letter of recommendation must come from a dentist attesting to the applicant having spent a reasonable amount of time with the practitioner exploring the dental profession.
UM - A minimum of 100 hours of dental shadowing and/or volunteering is required.

Competitive GPA

UDM - 3.50 science, 3.57 overall
UM - 3.49 science, 3.57 cumulative

Competitive Dental Admission Test (DAT) Score

UDM - 20.0 Academic Average; 20 Perceptual Ability; 20 Total Science
UM - 20.0 Academic Average; 21 Perceptual Ability; 21 Total Science

Michigan Dental School Websites

University of Detroit Mercy - www.dental.udmercy.edu
University of Michigan - www.dent.umich.edu

Other Important Websites

Explore Health Careers - www.explorehealthcareers.org
Resources for Pre-dental Students - www.GoDental.org
American Dental Education Association - www.adea.org
ADEA Official Guide to Dental Schools - www.adea.org/publications/Pages/OfficialGuide.aspx
Associated American Dental Schools Application Service (AADSAS) - www.adea.org/dental_education_pathways/aadsas/Applicants/Pages/default.aspx
CNS Preprofessional student information pages - http://ns.msu.edu/index.php/students/preprofessional/

Courses

Each medical school has its own prerequisite course guide available on its website.  Please open this printable Course Requirements for Michigan Medical Schools for a handy summary of courses required by the 7 medical schools in the state of Michigan.

Additional recommended courses, experiences, scores, and grades

Central Michigan University College of Medicine
www.cmich.edu/colleges/cmed

Other recommended courses:  Inorganic chemistry, biochemistry, behavioral sciencs (psychology, sociology, anthropology), medical humanities, physics, communications, ethics, biostatistics
Also:  200 hours combined experience in health, community service, research, and leadership positions.  Must include clinical and voluntary community services.
Competitive GPA: 3.6 science, 3.7 overall
Competitive MCAT: 29

MSU College of Human Medicine
www.humanmedicine.msu.edu

Requires two upper-level biological science courses, typically withing the following areas:  Highly recommended - anatomy, biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, immunology, or physiology.  Also recommended - embryology, microbiology, molecular biology, neuroscience.
Competitive GPA: 3.58 science, 3.67 overall
Competitive MCAT: 30

MSU College of Osteopathic Medicine
www.com.msu.edu

Strongly encouraged: An additional 4 to 6 courses in senior level biological sciences such as anatomy, physiology, histology, microbiology, immunology, and neurobiology.   Ideally, at least 4 of these classes completed prior to submitting application.
Also: Service to community, military service, paid employment, sports, overseas study and travel, leadership
Competitive GPA: 3.6 science, 3.7 overall
Competitive MCAT: 28

Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine
www.oakland.edu/medicine

Other recommended courses: 1 semester biochemistry, 2 semesters social/behavioral sciences (sociology, pshychology, anthropology). 
Also: Humanities, English/writing
Competitive GPA: 3.54 science, 3.65 overall
Competitive MCAT: 31

University of Michigan Medical School
http://medicine.umich.edu/medschool/

Suggested electives: Comparative health care systems, epidemiology, gender and health, genetics and cell biology, health policy, health services research and evaluation, human physiology, introduction to the American health care system, medical anthropology, medical ethics, medical economics or finance, medical history, medical sociology, psychology and sociology of aging, statistics.  In general, the study of fewer subjects, but in more depth, is recommended.
Competitive GPA: 3.83 science, 3.85 overall
Competitive MCAT: 36

Wayne State University School of Medicine
http://admissions.med.wayne.edu/index.php

Other recommended courses: Biochemistry, genetics, physiology, comparative anatomy, cell or molecular biology
Notes regarding prerequisites: AP courses are accepted, but AP basic science courses should be augmented with higher level college courses; online courses are not accepted; community college courses are accepted on a case-by-case basis.
Competitive GPA: 3.78 science, 3.81 overall
Competitive MCAT: 31

Western Michigan University School of Medicine
www.med.wmich.edu

Strongly recommended: Biochemistry, genetics, psychology/behavioral science, social science
Additional recommendations: Anatomy, physiolgy, microbiology, statistics or biostatistics, communication, research design/methodolgy & data analysis, critical thinking & logic, ethical theory & values
Competitive GPA: Minimum 3.25 overall will be considered
Competitive MCAT: Minimum 24 will be considered

Professional attributes

Every medical school looks for candidates who demonstrate critical thinking and problem solving skills, commitment to service, compassion, cultural competence, social skills, effective written and oral communication skills, capacity for leadership and collaborative teamwork, a value system centered on ethical behavior and responsibility, intellectual curiosity, open-mindedness, and a commitment to lifelong learning.  Students who take initiative to seek experiences and service opportunities and to form meaningful connections with professors and mentors in academia and the work world will have stronger applications.

The Nutritional Science B.S. degree with the pre-health professional and research option is an excellent fit for many pre-health students. Refer to the following links to see how this program meets course equivalents for typical professional school requirements.

How do health professional schools view a Nutritional Sciences degree?

Professional programs and schools do not require specific majors for entrance. This means that students should choose a major that interests them. Professional schools do not give preference to any major; instead, students must have completed the prerequisite courses listed by the school. The Nutritional Science degree at Michigan State University provides all or nearly all of the prerequisites for entry into health profession schools, combined with advanced nutrition courses for a unique focus on how food impacts health.

American Medical Association: Indicates that it takes a “well-rounded high school and college education, including classes related to the study of human beings” to enter and succeed in medical school.

Association of American Medical Schools: States, “You’ll need a strong foundation in mathematics and the sciences that relate most to medicine: biology, general chemistry, organic chemistry, and physics. But it’s important for your college experience to be broad.”

American Dental Association: Suggests that students need simply to take the required science courses for admission to dental school but can (and do) choose to be many majors (about half of all students enrolled in dental school in 2007-2008 choose a major other than “biological science”).

American Pharmacists Association: Indicates, “you are not required to major in ‘pre-pharmacy’ in college to be eligible for admission to pharmacy school. Pharmacy students… come from a wide variety of educational backgrounds…”

If I change my mind . . .

Have a backup plan. Less than 10 percent of new freshman who declare themselves pre-med ever apply to medical school, usually because they change their mind. This is an important reason to choose a major that interests you.

In addition to pre-health professional schools…

Nutritional Sciences graduates are prepared for graduate education in nutrition and related fields and to participate in nutrition research and education. Some Nutritional Sciences students also choose to double major in dietetics so they have the option to follow the path toward becoming a registered dietitian.

Contact Information

Department Phone List FSHN_Phone_List_Sept_2014.pdf

Food Science and Human Nutrition Department Office

Fred Derksen, Chairperson

Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
469 Wilson Rd, room 204
East Lansing, MI 48824
Phone: (517) 355-8474; Fax: (517) 353-8963

Undergraduate Degree Programs

Undergraduate Advising Center/Trout Career Center
Dept of Food Science and Human Nutrition
469 Wilson Road, room 106
East Lansing, MI 48824
Phone: (517) 353-3318; Fax: (517) 353-8963
Cheryle Nelson, Undergraduate Secretary
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Graduate Degree Programs

Graduate Studies Office
Dept of Food Science and Human Nutrition
469 Wilson Road, room 106
East Lansing, MI 48824
Phone: (517) 353-3323; Fax: (517) 353-8963
Lainie Buckles, Graduate Secretary
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Dairy Processing Facility

John Partridge, Faculty Coordinator
Food Science and Human Nutrition
474 S. Shaw Lane, room 2100B
East Lansing, MI 48824
Phone: (517) 353-3357; Fax: (517) 353-1676
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Dairy Store

John Engstrom, Manager
Food Science and Human Nutrition
474 S. Shaw Lane, room 1140
East Lansing, MI 48824
Phone: (517) 353-8466
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Meat Processing Facility

Jennifer Dominguez, Manager
Food Science and Human Nutrition
474 S. Shaw Lane, room 1358
East Lansing, MI 48824
Phone: (517) 353-9773
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)   

Information Technology

Amin El-Rashid, Computer Network Coordinator
Food Science and Human Nutrition
G.M. Trout FSHN Building
469 Wilson Rd, Room 115A
East Lansing, MI 48824
Phone: (517) 353-3327
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

 

Map and driving directions to Food Science and Human Nutrition. *Adobe Acrobat Reader is required to read PDF documents.

 

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the nation’s largest professional organization for dietitians. As a student enrolled in a dietetic program in an accredited university, but not yet eligible for active membership, you have the opportunity to become a student member of the organization. Benefits of membership include:

By far, the most important advantages to you as an Academy student member are the journal, and access to the Evidence Analysis Library.  You get all this for a very small annual fee. Ask a RD faculty member for more information. The dietetics faculty strongly urge you to become a member of the Academy.

To join the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics as a student member, in addition to submitting the fee, you must complete a membership application.  You can apply online at the Academy’s Web site at www.eatright.org.

Michigan Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

The Michigan Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is Michigan’s professional organization for dietitians. Students who are members of the national organization are automatically members of the state affiliate. Some of the advantages include:

By becoming an Academy member, you can improve your marketability, networking, and get to know dietitians in your own geographic area. Consult your adviser for more information, or you can visit the Web site at www.eatrightmich.org

Lansing Dietetic Association (LDA)

The local Lansing Dietetic Association, one of the state dietetic associations, can provide students a good opportunity to attend professional meetings, interact with local dietitians and develop professionally. The membership fee for students is nominal and the rewards are great professionally and personally. LDA members often know of volunteer opportunities for students.

Honorary Societies

Students who maintain a high GPA and/or fulfill other criteria are most likely to be asked to become a member of a campus honor society. The benefits of joining these societies include recognition for your achievements, boosting a resume, networking and an opportunity to gain experience in an organization by becoming an officer and developing leadership skills. However, joining an honor society can be costly. The initial fee could be $50 or more. There may also be annual dues to consider. Honor society membership is a product of your hard work, and it allows for recognition of your achievements.

Food & Nutrition Association (FNA)

The FNA is an organization for and led by students enrolled in dietetics or nutritional sciences. Meetings are held bi-weekly. There is a nominal membership fee for FNA, charged yearly or by semester. Many interesting topics related to nutrition, foods and dietetics are discussed at meetings. Some past topics have included behavior and food habits, HIV and nutrition, eating disorders, resume writing and many more. Presentations given by area professionals introduce students to varied career opportunities in dietetics. Other events the FNA participates in are the Lansing Dietetic Food-n-Fitness Fun Run, pot-luck dinners, a community-service project, and department and college events. In addition to obtaining information about the field of nutrition, students also get a chance to make new friends and be more engaged in the dietetics program. Meetings are announced in HNF classes, through emails, and posted on the bulletin boards in Trout Food Science and Human Nutrition Building. Being an officer is an excellent leadership opportunity. Elections are held at the end of spring semester for the following year. For further information, e-mail .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or contact an adviser. FNA members are eligible to apply for the two FNA scholarships offered annually. Their Web site is www.msu.edu/~fna

Student Senate of the College of Agriculture & Natural Resources

Student Senate is the academic voice of students in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. It’s composed of one undergraduate representative of every student club and every major in the college. Everyone is invited to attend the meetings.

College of Agriculture & Natural Resources Student Ambassadors

Students in the College of Agriculture & Natural Resources who are enthusiastic about their Michigan State University experience may be nominated by faculty and advisers to be CANR student ambassadors. Ambassadors assist the college by hosting guests on campus and traveling to high schools or community colleges, career fairs, or conferences to speak with prospective students interested in MSU and CANR programs.

Student Participation: Department Undergraduate Affairs Committee

Student participation in the department’s decisions is important. Keeping the department in contact with the students and their needs benefits everyone. The student who becomes involved with the Department Undergraduate Affairs Committee learns a great deal not only about the rules, procedures and processes, but also about working as a part of a team and accomplishing goals. The learning is invaluable. Contacting the department chairperson and members of committees that are of particular interest to you are the best ways to learn more about what is going on, be a part of the changes you would like to see and create your own learning experience. One student member each from the Food & Nutrition Association, Nutritional Sciences Club, and Food Science Club is elected to serve on the Department Undergraduate Affairs Committee.

Undergraduate Department Aide Program

Jobs as Department Aides in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition are available to provide opportunities for mature, accomplished, undergraduate students to assist FSHN faculty in teaching a FSC or HNF course.  Please contact your academic adviser for further details if you have interest in this experience.

What is meant by Registered Dietitian?

The term registered dietitian (RD) is a credential that can be used only by individuals who have completed the following requirements:

When I receive my bachelor’s of science degree in dietetics from MSU, will I be a registered dietitian?

No. Completion of an ACEND-accredited didactic program in dietetics, such as at MSU, is only the first step required to become a registered dietitian.

The second step, completion of an accredited supervised practice experience program follows completion of the didactic program and the minimum of a bachelor’s degree. See the following description of these programs.

Students need to be aware that receiving an appointment to a supervised practice experience program is competitive, and there are no guarantees that students will receive an appointment.

The third and final step to become a RD is successfully passing the national Registration Exam for Dietitians.

What is a Supervised Practice Experience Program?

Graduates in dietetics must complete a supervised practice program in dietetics that has been approved or accredited by ACEND. There are currently two types of supervised practice experience programs.  The usual path for a dietetics graduate is to apply to and complete a dietetic internship.

What is an Accredited Dietetic Internship?

An accredited dietetic internship provides a minimum of 1200 hours of supervised practice in hospitals, nursing homes, public health programs, and in institutional foodservice operations with training by working dietitians (termed preceptors).  The internship takes place after the completion of at least a baccalaureate degree and ACEND minimum academic requirements. Most are full-time over a 9-11 month period of time.  Some are combined with a master’s degree and take 18-24 months.  Please see the MSU Dietetic Internship Program for more information.

What is a Coordinated Program?

A coordinated program in dietetics integrates academic requirements with supervised practice within the last two years of an academic program. Each program is accredited by the ACEND and culminates in a minimum of a baccalaureate degree. Typically, students must apply to a coordinated program after completing prerequisites and reaching junior status, and the number of students accepted is limited. MSU does not have a coordinated program. Some coordinated programs accept students who have already completed a baccalaureate degree prior to the coordinated program.

ACUHO-NACUFS Summer Experience 

ACUHO-NACUFS Summer Experience 

The ACUHO-NACUFS Foodservice Management Internship sponsored by the Association of College and University Housing Officers-International (ACUHO-I) and the National Association of College and University Foodservices (NACUFS) is an eight-week program designed to give students an opportunity to learn and experience one part of the foodservice industry through exposure to a college/university setting.

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Purposes of the Program

Who May Apply

Students from Michigan State University have found the ACUHO/NACUFS Program to be an exceptional experience. MSU students successfully completing this program can substitute the experience in HNF 445 “Foodservice Management Experience.”

For an application, visit the NACUFS web page:  http://www.nacufs.org/careers-internships.

Independent Study and Practicum Experience

Independent study is available to students in nearly all departments. For dietetics students, the course number is HNF 490, or it can be taken as an honors option under HNF 490H. Independent study allows students to explore interests in a particular area outside of a normal classroom setting. The professor helps with the exploration by guiding and offering expertise to the student. Overall, this experience can enhance an undergraduate program, experiences and references.

Students wanting to obtain professional experience in selected settings and organizations under faculty supervision may enroll in a 494 Practicum course. Students receive a pass/fail in 494 courses rather than a specific grade. For example, in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, students would enroll in HNF 494 and would work with specific faculty.

Meeting with a faculty member is the first step in the process of establishing an independent study or practicum experience. Once the student decides what area to explore and the faculty member agrees to sponsor, the independent study or practicum experience contract is made.

Olin Health Education:  REACH Program

REACH is a peer health advocacy program that focuses on promoting a positive campus community that reflects the attitudes, behaviors, and values of a healthy Spartan lifestyle. 

REACH is a one-credit academic course typically, but not always, offered in Spring.  Students are provided with experiential and didactic learning opportunities on both the philosophies of health education as well as specialized topic areas.  At the end of Spring, interested and eligible students will be asked to enroll for 2 more semesters (one-credit each) for the service component of REACH in the next academic year.

For more information or to request an application, e-mail REACH at:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Dietetics students enroll in HNF 490 in a section designated specifically for Reach advocates.  Enrollment requires approval of the Olin health education director, completion of an Application for Independent Study available in the Trout Career Center (106 Trout FSHN Building), and request for an override.  The FSHN faculty coordinator for the program is Dr. Lorraine Weatherspoon.

Foodservice Experience

Students may obtain foodservice experience by employment “for pay” in one of the residence halls foodservices on campus, including Brody, Case, Holden, Wilson, Holmes, Akers, McDonel, Hubbard, Owen, Shaw, West Circle (Landon and Yakeley), and Snyder/Phillips. Through this experience, students will be exposed to various aspects of foodservice. This experience in foodservice will lay an essential and excellent foundation for success in HNF 445, the foodservice practicum course. Hardworking students, exhibiting potential and an excellent work ethic, are eligible for promotion to student supervisor in the residence halls foodservices. Apply in the foodservice manager’s office at the residence hall of your choice.

Service Learning Center, Volunteer Services

The volunteer services program at Michigan State University is located in the Service Learning Center, Room 27 of the Student Services Building. Volunteer experiences are very important to a student in planning for the future. The more diet-related work experience one has, the better the chances of receiving a dietetic internship appointment. The experience may help students decide if they have chosen the right major. The Services Learning  Center at MSU has positions available in hospital and nursing home dietary departments that provide experience in the clinical setting as well as in community programs. Placement in nutrition education programs may also be available.

Students must sign up for volunteer experiences online or in the Service Learning Center at the Student Services Building. Check with the Service Learning Center about sign-up dates. The most popular experiences go very fast.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science Degree in Dietetics

120 semester credits required for graduation

University Requirements in Integrative Studies

Total Credits: 20

All of the following courses:
CourseCredit
IAH – Arts & Humanities IAH 201-210 (choice) 4
IAH – Arts & Humanities IAH 211-241 (choice) 4
ISS – Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences ISS 200-level 4
ISS – Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences ISS 300 level 4
ISB* – Biological Sciences (alternate track required) (3+)
ISP* – Physical Sciences (alternate track required) (3+)
ISB/ISP* – Biological or Physical Sciences Laboratory (alternate track required) 2
Tier I Writing WRA 110-150 (choice) 4

Tier II Writing requirement completed in major by HNF 300 and HNF 471 and HNF 472

 

*Students who are enrolled in the dietetics major complete an alternative track to Integrative Studies in the Biological and Physical Sciences that consists of the following courses: Physiology 250/Biochemistry 200; Chemistry 141, 143, 161.  The completion of CEM 161 and CEM 143 satisfies the laboratory requirement.

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College of Agriculture & Natural Resources Requirements

Total Credits: 3

One of the following courses:
CourseCredit
EC 201 – Introduction to Microeconomics 3
EC 202 – Introduction to Macroeconomics 3

College math requirement met in the major with MTH 103 or 116 (or higher) PLUS STT 200 or 201.

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Major Requirements

Total Credits: 83-84

 

Supporting Discipline Courses

Total Credits: 39-40

Complete all of the following:
CourseCredit
ANTR 350 – Human Gross Anatomy for Pre-Health Professionals 3
BMB 200 – Introduction to Biochemistry 4
CEM 141 – General Chemistry 4
CEM 143 – Survey of Organic Chemistry 4
CEM 161 – Chemistry Laboratory I 1
CSE 101 – Computing Concepts and Competencies 3
FSC 342 – Food Safety and HACCP 3
MGT 325 – Management Skills and Processes 3
PSL 250 – Introductory Physiology 4
PSY 101– Introductory Psychology 4
One of the following courses:
CourseCredit
MTH 103 – College Algebra 3
MTH 116 – College Algebra and Trigonometry          4
Higher Level Math 3+
AND one of the following courses:
CourseCredit
STT 200 – Statistical Methods 3
STT 201 – Statistical Methods with Lab                    4

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Professional Courses

Total Credits: 44

Complete all of the following:
CourseCredit
HNF 150 – Introduction to Human Nutrition 3
HNF 300 – Experimental Approaches to Foods 4
HNF 320 – Professional Practice of Dietetics and Nutrition 3
HNF 377 – Applied Community Nutrition 4
HNF 400 – Art and Science of Food Preparation 2
HNF 406 – Global Foods and Culture 3
HNF 440 – Foodservice Operations 3
HNF 444 – Business of Nutrition Services 3
HNF 445 – Foodservice Management Practicum 2
HNF 453 – Nutrition and Human Development 3
HNF 461 – Advanced Human Nutrition: Carbohydrates, Lipids, Proteins 3
HNF 462 – Advanced Human Nutrition: Vitamins and Minerals 3
HNF 471 – Medical Nutrition Therapy 1 4
HNF 472 – Medical Nutrition Therapy 2 4

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Elective Courses

Total Credits: 13 - 14

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An academic program that prepares students to use advanced knowledge about food and nutrition to help prevent and treat disease and maintain and promote health.  It is…

Dietetics at Michigan State University

What is a Registered Dietitian?

Registered Dietitian (RD) is a professional credential used by individuals who have completed the following steps:

Step 1  — Successful completion of a didactic program in dietetics and earning a bachelor of science degree
Step 2  — Completion of an accredited dietetic internship
Step 3  — Pass the national registration examination for dietitians

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics has prepared a video describing the work of registered dietitians.
Video:  What a Registered Dietitian Can Do For You

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Career Opportunities as a Registered Dietitian

Perhaps the largest number of  dietitians work in clinical practice—such as in a hospital or extended care facility.  Many also work in a community health setting, such as at a health department, often in programs for at-risk populations, such as WIC (Women, Infants, Children), Head Start, or programs for seniors.  Some dietitians’ responsibilities are concentrated in the foodservice operations where dietary modifications may be necessary.  Here are some areas of focus:

Contact the adviser:

Linda Summers, MS, RD
Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition
G. M. Trout FSHN Building
469 Wilson Road, room 106C
East Lansing, MI 48824-1224
Phone: (517) 353-3322
Fax: (517) 353-8963
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Enrollment in the dietetics major is limited.  The Bachelor of Science degree in Dietetics is a professional degree which requires acceptance into a competitive post-bachelor’s dietetic internship in order to complete the requirements for eligibility to take the registered dietitian examination.  A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.5 is necessary to be considered for admission but does not guarantee admission.  The number of students admitted depends on the number of slots available and the number of applicants each semester.  During the past 2 years, the GPA cut-point for admission has been a steady minimum of 3.0. 

Dietetics sophomores are automatically entered into the application pool when they reach junior status (56 credits or more).  Juniors and seniors in other majors who wish to be considered for admission to the dietetics major may complete an Application for Admission Review.  Admission decisions are made at the end of each semester after grades are posted.  The application form is available in the FSHN Career Center, 106 G.M. Trout FSHN Building or may be downloaded via the link below.  Advising Center phone:  (517) 355-8474 x 118. 

Junior-level transfer students may be considered for admission to the dietetics program after meeting prerequisite course requirements listed on the Office of Admissions website at www.admissions.msu.edu/admission/transfer_limitedEnrollment.asp

MSU Students may reserve an appointment with the dietetics adviser via the online Advising Appointment System, here.  Non-MSU students may call the phone number above to arrange an appointment.

Application:  Admission Review for Dietetics Program

Many of our food science majors participate in internships at least once during their undergraduate program. Students receive course credits and gain invaluable professional experience working in the food industry. Food science students have held internships at the following companies within the past ten years:

                                                    
For more information, please contact:

Dr. Kirk Dolan
Dept of Food Science & Human Nutrition
G.M. Trout FSHN Building
469 Wilson Rd, Rm 135B
East Lansing, MI  48824
Phone: (517) 353-3333
Fax: (517) 353-8963
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Michigan State University’s Food Science Club is the number one social and professional networking tool for undergraduate and graduate Food Science students within the Food Science and Human Nutrition Department. The club meets once weekly during the spring and fall semesters. Each meeting may be a learning experience offering informational and networking sessions with companies or a social gathering with other students in the Food Science major.

Past meetings have included visits from Kellogg Company, Post, ConAgra, Campbell’s Soup Company, and Domino’s Pizza. We work with these companies to help them recruit interns and full-time employees while exposing our students to different aspects and careers within the food industry.

Other meetings include a graduate studies meeting with a panel of graduate students and graduate advisors or watching and discussing documentaries as a group.

Social events for the club include Spartan Football tailgating, bar crawls, white elephant gift exchanges, and even tours of local breweries. These events are the best way to get to know other food science students outside of class.

To view pictures of club events and to receive updates on weekly meetings and social events, “like” the club’s Facebook page: Michigan State University’s Food Science Club. Also receive updates by following the club on Twitter: @FoodSciClubMSU.

http://fsclub.fshn.msu.edu/

Institute of Food Technologists

221 North LaSalle Street, Suite 300
Chicago, IL 60601-1291
Phone: (312) 782-8424
Fax: (312) 782-8348
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
www.ift.org
Great Lakes Section of IFT 

AACC International
(formerly American Association of Cereal Chemists)

AACC Headquarters
3340 Pilot Knob Road
St. Paul, MN 55121
Phone: (612) 454-7250
Fax: (612) 454-0766
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
www.aaccnet.org

American Meat Science Association

9140 Ward Parkway, Suite 200
Kansas City, MO 64114
Phone: (816) 444-3500
Fax: (816) 444-0330
www.meatscience.org

American Chemical Society

1155 16th Street, NW
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: (202) 872-4600
www.acs.org

American Oil Chemists’ Society

1608 Broadmoor Drive
Champaign, IL 61821-5930
Phone: (217) 359-2344
Fax: (217) 351-8091
www.aocs.org

American Dairy Science Association

1111 North Dunlap Avenue
Savoy, IL 61874
Phone: (217) 356-3182
Fax: (217) 398-4119
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
www.adsa.org

American Society of Agricultural & Biological Engineers

2950 Niles Road
St. Joseph, MI 49085-9659
Phone: (616) 429-0300
Fax: (616) 429-3852
www.asabe.org/

Poultry Science Organization

1111 N. Dunlop Ave.
Savoy, IL 61874
Fax: (217) 398-4119
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
www.poultryscience.org

International Association in Food Protection (formerly IAMFES)

6200 Aurora Ave., Suite 200W
Des Moines, IA 50322-2863
Phone: (800) 369-6337
Fax: (515) 276-8655
Web site: http://www.foodprotection.org/

Food Science Club

The Food Science Club provides an informal forum for undergraduate and graduate students to develop awareness of current needs in the food industry. It is a first step toward membership in a professional organization. Club members develop projects during the year to support visits to food and beverage plants and sponsor social events. Opportunities to attend regional and national Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) meetings as well as attend social activities and athletic events are part of the club’s activities. Members also have input to food science and human nutrition student operations through the Food Science Club.''

Food Science Dairy Products Evaluation Team

The Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition sponsors a student dairy products evaluation team. Students learn to evaluate various dairy products for sensory attributes. This team competes annually in regional and national contests in the United States and Canada.

Product Development Team

MSU food science undergraduate and graduate students team together and take product ideas and prototypes developed in the food science capstone course, Food Product Development (FSC 470), to higher levels of development. They expand and improve on these concepts preparing a five-page proposal that is submitted to the Institute of Food Technologist’s Student Division’s Food Product Development Competition and scored by five food industry judges. Over 25 schools compete each year and our MSU teams have been selected as one of the six finalists in four of the last five years. Finalists compete at the National Convention held in New Orleans, Las Vegas, Los Angeles and Chicago. Team members receive money from the A. Jackson Scholarship fund and travel money from the Great Lakes IFT section in addition to the $1,000 finalist money awarded. This activity is an excellent opportunity for students to interact with industry leaders and gain excellent work experience that is highly valued by industry.

College Bowl

Various universities put their food science knowledge and experience to the test as they compete with each other in quiz bowl. Universities participating in previous competitions include: Purdue University, University of Wisconsin at Madison, University of Wisconsin at River Falls and The Ohio State University. In the event that the college bowl is held at MSU, members get the opportunity to host and interact with fellow food science members. Faculty members in FSHN host a practice night for team members.

Professional Organizations

Numerous societies and associations exist for the expansion and improvements in the diverse field of food science. Many faculty members recommend that students join a professional society to increase their individual awareness of the food field. For example, membership in the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) provides students a greater understanding of the relevance of course materials, a broader perspective of the food field and aids students in identifying career tracks. The institute’s popular journal outlines current topics and issues in foods, provides selected research papers and lists employment opportunities. Reading IFT publications improves students’ understanding of the food industry and increases students’ awareness of the diverse aspects of food science.

Food Technology: Focus on Food Processing and Quality

Total Credits: 23

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The concentration in food technology provides the student with extra emphasis in food processing operations. This concentration will prepare graduates for careers in production supervision, quality assurance, inspection, product development and process development. Students may concentrate study within one or more of the four commodity groups, integrating the study of production methods and their effect on food quality and process characteristics. Graduates will also be prepared for postgraduate studies leading to research, production and management careers in the food industry, government and academia.

All of the following courses:

STT 201 Statistical Methods (4)
CEM 143 Survey of Organic Chemistry (4)
BMB 200 Introduction to Biochemistry (4)
FSC 420 Quality Assurance (2)

Nine Credits from the following courses:

FSC 430 Food Processing: Fruits and Vegetables (3)
FSC 431 Food Processing: Cereals (3)
FSC 432 Food Processing: Dairy Foods (3)
FSC 433 Food processing: Meat, Poultry and Fish (3)
FSC 421 Food Laws and Regulations (3)
HB 100 Introduction to Hospitality Business (2)
HB 265 Food Management: Safety and Nutrition (3)
HB 267 Management of Food and Beverage Systems (3)
HNF 300 Experimental Approaches to Food (4)

Elective:

FSC 493 Professional Internship (3-6)

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Food Business and Industry: Business, Distribution and Marketing Aspects of Food

Total Credits: 23

This concentration prepares students for employment in food or food-related businesses, where knowledge of food science, marketing and business is important. Course work readies students for careers in manufacturing management, technical sales, food product marketing or similar areas. Courses in marketing and food systems supplement the core program of basic sciences and food science thereby integrating the science of food with business, management and economics. Selected electives in this concentration can prepare students for entry into MBA programs at most business schools. Several courses in this concentration can be used toward completion of the Specialization in Food Industry Management.

All of the following courses: (15 Credits)

STT 315 Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Business (3)
CEM 143 Survey of Organic Chemistry (4)
BMB 200 Introduction to Biochemistry (4)
ACC 230 Survey of Accounting Concepts (3)
MSC 327 Introduction to Marketing (3)

Two of the following courses:

MSC 302 Consumer and Organizational Buyer Behavior (3)
ABM 100 Decision Making in the Agri-Food System (3)
ABM 222 Agribusiness and Food Industry Sales (3)
FIM 220 Food Product Marketing (3)
FIM 335 Food Marketing Management (3)
FI 311 Financial Management (3)
or
ABM 435 Financial Management in the Agri-Food System (3)

Elective:

FSC 493 Professional Internship (3)

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Food Packaging: Focus on Food Packaging Systems and Product Stability

Total Credits: 26

The food packaging concentration supplements a strong core in the basic and applied sciences and food sciences with an emphasis in food packaging. Courses focus on design, use and evaluation of food packaging materials. For example, course topics include physical and chemical properties of packaging materials as well as methodology used to study the effect of packaging materials on the shelf life of food. This concentration prepares students for careers in the food industry and offers excellent preparation for graduate studies in packaging or food science.

All of the following courses: (Credits)

STT 201 Statistical Methods (4)
CEM 143 Survey of Organic Chemistry (4)
BMB 200 Intro to Biochemistry (4)
MMG 301 Fundamentals of Microbiology (3)
MMG 302 Introductory Microbiology Laboratory (1)
PKG 101 Principles of Packaging (3)
PKG 221 Packaging with Glass and Metal (3)
PKG 322 Packaging with Paper and Paperboard (4)
PKG 323 Packaging with Plastics (4)

Elective:

FSC 493 Professional Internship (3)

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Basic Food Science

Total Credits: 25

The Basic Food Science concentration fills many, but not all, of the minimum requirements for admission to professional schools. Students interested in preparing for post-graduate professional programs should consult with a preprofessional advisor in the College of Natural Science. Admission requirements of professional schools vary and he student is responsible for reviewing the requirements of each school of interest and consulting regularly with an advisor

All of the following courses:

BMB 401 Basic Biochemistry (4)
CEM 251 Organic Chemistry I (3)
CEM 252 Organic Chemistry II (3)
CEM 255 Organic Chemistry Laboratory (2)
STT 201 Statistical Methods (4)

Nine credits from the following courses:

ANS 407 Food and Animal Toxicology (3)
ANS 417 Topics in Toxicology (1)
CEM 262 Quantitative Analysis (3)
CEM 333 Instrumental Methods and Applications (3)
CEM 383 Introductory Physical Chemistry I (3)
FSC 342 Food Safety and Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point Program (3)
FSC 421 Food Laws and Regulations (3)
FSC 423 Functional Foods and Human Health (3)
MMG 409 Eucaryotic Cell Biology (3)
MMG 425 Microbial Ecology (3)
MMG 431 Microbial Genetics (3)
MMG 445 Basic Biotechnology (3)
MMG 451 Immunology (3)
PHM 350 Introductory Human Pharmacology (3)
PHM 450 Intro to Chemical Toxicity (3)

Elective:

FSC 493 Professional Internship (3)

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The Food Processing and Technology specialization provides undergraduates with an introduction to food processing and technology to complement technical or business skills acquired in other majors. This specialization offers students interested in careers in the food industry – but whose primary interest is outside the traditional realm of food science – an introduction to food processing, food safety, food laws and food quality assurance. This specialization provides students with the fundamental knowledge of food science to broaden their educational background and enhance their attractiveness to employers.

Requirements for the Food Processing and Technology Specialization

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One of the following courses (3 credits):

FSC 211 – Introduction to Food Science (3 credits)
ANS 201 – Animal Products (3 credits)

The following course (3 credits):

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FSC 325 – Food Processing: Unit Operations (3 credits)

Two of the following courses (5-6 credits):

FSC 342 – Food Safety and HACCP (3 credits)
FSC 420 – Quality Assurance (2 credits)
FSC 421 – Food Laws and Regulations (3 credits)

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One of the following courses (3 credits):

FSC 430 – Food Processing: Fruits and Vegetables (3 credits)
FSC 431 – Food Processing: Cereals (3 credits)

FSC 432 – Food Processing: Dairy (3 credits)
FSC 433 – Food Processing: Muscle Foods (3 credits)
 

To enroll in the Specialization in Food Processing and Technology, contact:

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Dr. John Partridge
Dept of Food Science & Human Nutrition
Anthony Hall
 469 Wilson Rd., Room 106D
East Lansing, MI  48824
Phone: (517) 353-3320
Fax: (517) 432-5295
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

120 semester credits required for graduation

Concentrations

University Requirements in Integrative Studies

Total Credits: 28

Complete all of the following courses:

IAH – Arts & Humanities IAH 201-210 (choice) (4 credits)

IAH – Arts & Humanities IAH 211-241 (choice) (4 credits)

ISS – Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences ISS 200-level (4 credits)

ISS – Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences ISS 300 level (4 credits)

BS 161 – Cells and Moleculer Biology (3 credits)

CEM 161 – Chemistry Laboratory I (1 credit)

CEM 162 – Chemistry Laboratory II (1 credit)

PHY 231 – Introductory Physics I (3 credits)

Tier I Writing WRA 110-150 (choice) (4 credits)

College of Agriculture & Natural Resources Requirements

Total Credits: 3

Complete one of the following options:

EC 201 - Introduction to Microeconomics (3 credits)

EC 202 - Introduction to Macroeconomics (3 credits)

Mathematics requirement met by Department Core Requirements.

Major Requirements

Total Credits: 51

Department Core Requirements

Total Credits: 14

Complete all of the following courses:

MTH 124 - Survey of Calculus with Applications (3 credits)

CEM 141 - General Chemistry (4 credits)

CEM 142 - General and Inorganic Chemistry (3 credits)

MMG 301 - Introductory Microbiology (3 credits)

 

Food Science Core Courses

Total Credits: 37

Complete all of the following courses:

FSC 211 - Principles of Food (3 credits)

BE 429 - Fundamentals of Food (3 credits)

FSC 325 - Food processing: Unit Operations (3 credits)

FSC 401 - Food Chemistry (3 credits)

FSC 402 - Food Chemistry Lab (1 credit)

FSC 440 - Food Microbiology (3 credits)

FSC 441 - Food Microbiology Lab (1 credit)

FSC 455 - Food Analysis (3 credits)

FSC 470 - Integrated Approaches (3 credits)

HNF 260 - Principles of Human Nutrition (3 credits)

FSC 410 - Sensory Assessment of Foods (3 credits)

Complete two of the following courses:

FSC 430 - Food Processing: Fruits and Vegetables (3 credits)

FSC 431 - Food Processing: Cereals (3 credits)

FSC 432 - Food Processing: Dairy Foods (3 credits)

FSC 433 - Food Processing: Muscle Foods (3 credits)

 
Concentrations

Students must complete the requirements for at least one of the following areas of concentration plus enough elective credits for a minimum of 120 credits.

Food Technology: Focus on Food Processing and Quality

Total Credits: 23

Complete all of the following courses:

STT 201 - Statistical Methods (4 credits)

CEM 143 - Survey of Organic Chemistry (4 credits)

BMB 200 - Introduction to Biochemistry (4 credits)

FSC 420 - Quality Assurance (2 credits)

Complete 9 credits from the following courses (*Courses selected to meet this requirement may not be used to fulfill requirement in the Department Core.):

*FSC 430 - Food Processing: Fruits and Vegetables (3 credits)

*FSC 431 - Food Processing: Cereals (3 credits)

*FSC 432 - Food Processing: Dairy (3 credits)

*FSC 433 - Food Processing: Meat, Foods (3 credits)

FSC 421 - Food Laws and Regulations (3 credits)

FSC 442 - HACCP Training and Certification (1 credit)

HB 100 - Introduction to Hospitality Business (2 credits)

HB 265 - Food Management: Safety and Nutrition (3 credits)

HB 267 - Management of Food and Beverage Systems (3 credits)

HNF 300 - Experimental Approaches to Food (4 credits)

CEM 482 - Science and Technology of Wine Production (3 credits)

CHE 483 - Brewing and Distilled Beverage Systems (3 credits)

FSC 481 - Fermented Beverages (3 credits)

HRT 403 - Handling and Storage of Horticultural Crops (3 credits)

HRT 430 - Exploring Wines and Vines (3 credits)

Elective:

FSC 493 - Professional Internship in Food Science (3-6 credits)

Food Business and Industry: Business, Distribution and Marketing Aspects of Food

Total Credits: 23

Complete all of the following courses:

STT 315 - Introductory to Probability and Statistics for Business (3 credits)

CEM 143 - Survey of Organic Chemistry (4 credits)

BMB 200 - Introduction to Biochemistry (4 credits)

ACC 230 - Survey of Accounting Concepts (3 credits)

MKT 327 - Introduction to Marketing (3 credits)

Complete two of the following courses:

MKT 302 - Consumer and Organization Buy Behavior (3 credits)

ABM 100 - Decision Making in the Agri-Food System (3 credits)

ABM 222 - Agribusiness and Food Industry Sales (3 credits)

FIM 220 - Food Product Marketing (3 credits)

FIM 335 - Food Marketing Management (3 credits)

FI 311 - Financial Management (3 credits) -OR- ABM 435 - Financial Management in the Agri-Food System (3 credits)

Elective:

FSC 493 - Professional Internship in Food Science (3-6 credits)

Food Packaging: Focus on Food Packaging Systems and Product Stability

Total Credits: 26

Complete all of the following courses:

STT 201 - Statistical Methods (4 credits)

CEM 143 - Survey of Organic Chemistry (4 credits)

BMB 200 - Introduction to Biochemistry (4 credits)

MMG 301 - Fundamental of Microbiology (3 credits)

MMG 302 - Introductory Microbiology Laboratory (1 credit)

PKG 101 - Principles of Packaging (3 credits)

PKG 221 - Packaging with Glass and Metal (3 credits)

PKG 322 - Packaging with Paper and Paperboard (4 credits)

PKG 323 - Packaging with Plastics (4 credits)

Elective:

FSC 493 - Professional Internship in Food Science (3-6 credits)

Basic Food Science

Total Credits: 25

Complete all of the following courses:

BMB 401 - Basic Biochemistry (4 credits)

CEM 251 - Organic Chemistry I (3 credits)

CEM 252 - Organic Chemistry II (3 credits)

CEM 255 - Organic Chemistry Laboratory (2 credits)

STT 201 - Statistical Methods (4 credits)

Complete 9 credits from the following courses:

ANS 407 - Food and Animal Toxicology (3 credits)

CEM 262 - Quantitative Analysis (3 credits)

CEM 333 - Instrumental Methods and Applications (3 credits)

CEM 383 - Introductory Physical Chemistry I (3 credits)

PHY 232 - Introductory Physics II (3 credits)

FSC 421 - Food Laws and Regulations (3 credits)

FSC 423 - Functional Foods and Human Health (3 credits)

MMG 409 - Eukaryotic Cell Biology (3 credits)

MMG 425 - Microbial Ecology (3 credits)

MMG 431 - Microbial Genetics (3 credits)

MMH 445 - Microbial Biotechnology (3 credits)

MMG 451 - Immunology (3 credits)

PHM 350 - Introductory Human Pharmacology (3 credits)

PHM 450 - Introduction to Chemical Toxicology (3 credits)

 

 The Basic Food Science concentration fills many, but not all, of the minimum requirements for admission to professional schools. Students interested in preparing for post-graduate professional programs should consult with a professional advisor in the College of Natural Science. Admission requirements of professional schools vary and the student is responsible for reviewing the requirements of each school of interest and consulting regularly with an advisor.

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The Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition has numerous scholarships available for all three undergraduate majors – dietetics, food science and nutritional sciences. These opportunities are available through an annual application process conducted during spring semester. Awards are normally available the following academic year.

The online scholarship application is available from mid-December to February 1 each year.  Applicants must be current students in the Department of Food Science & Human Nutrition.

Charles H. (Chuck) and Marjorie (Marge) Bagans Memorial Endowed Scholarship

Awarded to a undergraduate student enrolled in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition. Must demonstrate interest in the dairy sciences.

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Herman B. Blum Scholarship Fund in Food Science and Human Nutrition 

Recipients selected who are interested in food science and exhibit financial need

Albert and Mary Kay Bolles Scholarship in Food Science

Scholarship awarded to students who are majoring in Food Science majors with career plans as food scientists and a record of hard work.  Preference given to Lyman Briggs College students.

Bradford-Adams Endowed Scholarship for CANR FSHN

Award to students majoring in Dietetics with minimum GPA of 3.0

Bradford-Adams Endowed Scholarship for Natural Science Nutrition Science

Award to students majoring in Nutritional Sciences with minimum GPA of 3.0

Chenoweth Award in Dietetics and Human Nutrition

Awarded to a dietetic student accepted into a Dietetic Internship Program or a graduate student in human nutrition or medical-related program.

Virginia Dare Award

Awarded to one undergraduate student per university who has shown outstanding aptitude in a course related to the judging, manufacturing and utilization of flavors in ice cream. Preference is given to students participating in the Dairy Products Judging Team.

Dorothy E. Dugan Memorial Scholarship

Award to undergraduates in Food Science

Margaret A. Eaegle Endowed Scholarship

Awards made to juniors or seniors in dietetics or nutritional sciences. Minimum GPA of 3.0. Preference is given to U.S. citizens with financial need.

Food & Nutrition Association Senior Professional Development Award

Awarded to a senior graduating spring of application year enrolled in any major in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition. Consideration will be made based on active participation in FNA activities, recommendations, financial need and minimum GPA of 3.0 in major.

Food & Nutrition Association Undergraduate Scholarship

Award given to a freshman, sophomore or junior level student enrolled in any major in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition. Must have demonstrated active participation in FNA activities/programs. Preference is given to students with financial need and overall GPA of at least 3.0.

Frozen Food Industry Scholarship

Awarded to a full-time undergraduate student in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition. Must demonstrate sound academic performance by being a student in good standing within the university. Award to assist students in financial need who are pursuing a career in the food industry. (Provided by the Distinguished Order of Zerocrats).

Beth and Holly Fryer Endowed Scholarship

Awarded to an undergraduate student in foods and nutrition or graduate student in human nutrition. Minimum GPA of 3.2.

Future Leaders Mentoring Scholarship

Awarded to students in dietetics or nutritional sciences and maintaining a 3.0 GPA.  Preference to students entering their sophomore year who are first generation college students with financial need as determined by federal guidelines.  Students to be advised and mentored by the donor or designee.

Gerber “Carl G. Smith” Award for Excellence

Awarded to a junior in food science. Must have demonstrated academic excellence and exhibited outstanding leadership abilities as indicated by service and extracurricular activities.

Gerber Endowment Fund in Pediatric Nutrition and Food Science

Awarded to undergraduate students in dietetics, food science, or nutritional sciences demonstrating academic excellence. Must provide a statement of how your career plans relate to nutrition and food science with an emphasis on pediatrics.

The Max Gonzenbach Fund for Student Mentoring and Research

Awarded to full-time undergraduate students in dietetics, food science or nutritional sciences, or a graduate student in FSHN with a minimum GPA of 3.0. Must identify interest in participating in faculty-mentored research projects and scholarly opportunities designed to increase the understanding of foods, nutrition and health outcomes. Particular emphasis will be applied to dairy-based foods.

Daniel and Anne Guyer Spartan Cornerstone Scholarship Challenge

Sophomore eligible for federal need-based financial aid programs; preference for students in dietetics; awarded in alternate years starting in 2014-15.

The Constance Parks Hagelshaw and Doretha June Hagelshaw Scholarship Fund

Awarded to a full-time undergraduate student in FSHN. Must be a student in good academic standing.

P. Vincent Hegarty Food Science and Human Nutrition Quality in Education Fund

Funding awards to enhance quality of education for students in FSHN.

Andrew R. and Claudine Burkhart Jackson Dairy Food Science and Human Nutrition Scholarship

Awarded to a sophomore or junior student in FSHN with a minimum GPA of 3.0 and interest in dairy foods.

David and Mary Jessup Dietetic Internship Scholarship

Award to a Dietetic Senior who has demonstrated service to the community and a solid GPA.

W.K. Kellogg Institute for Food and Nutrition Research Scholarship in Food Science

Scholarship award to an Undergraduate students in food industry related majors, 3.0 GPA or better, U.S. citizen or permanent resident, full-time student, extra-curricular activities, demonstrated leadership, financial need and exhibits a passion for food.

Michigan Soybean Promotion Committee Scholarship

Awards to junior and seniors in dietetics and nutritional sciences.  Minimum GPA 3.0.  Submission of essay relating to use of soy in a healthy diet.

Marilyn Mook Endowed Scholarship

Awarded to a full-time undergraduate student in dietetics or nutritional sciences. Must intend to pursue a career in human nutrition and foods. Preference for students experiencing financial difficulty.

Delton and Dianne Parks Scholarship

Award to an undergraduate student enrolled in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition who is pursuing a career in Food Science with preference for students entering the field of dairy processing or production and demonstrating financial need.

Annette Rachman Scholarship

Awarded to an undergraduate in dietetics. Selection based on financial need, evidence of a successful future in selected field of study and academic achievement. Minimum GPA 2.0.

Lois Gordon Ridley Endowed Scholarship/Fellowship

Awarded to a full-time junior or senior in dietetics or nutritional sciences. Selection based on financial need, academic achievement (2.8 minimum GPA), professional goals, participation in preprofessional experiences/internships and on a balance of activities within the university and community.

The Rachel A. Schemmel Endowed Lecture/Undergraduate Research Scholarship

Award given to sophomores, juniors, or seniors with a minimum GPA of 3.0 and interest in laboratory research. This award includes laboratory funding to the faculty mentor.

Carl G. and Viola Smith Endowed Scholarship

Awarded to any undergraduate major in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition. Students receiving this award must be considering a career in the food science/human nutrition fields. Preference given to undergraduate applicants with good academic standing. Minority students will be given special consideration.

Charles M. Stine Memorial Scholarship

Awarded to a senior in food science. Minimum GPA of 3.0.

Tropicana Diversity Scholarship

Established to promote diversity within the food industry.  Preference for food science freshman or sophomore.  Must demonstrate progress in the program and effort toward a career path.  Minimum GPA of 3.09.

G. Malcolm Trout Undergraduate Scholarship

Awards given to undergraduate students enrolled full-time in any major in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition. Must demonstrate sound academic performance by being a student in “good standing” within the university.

Verlene & Dale K. Weber Food Science Scholarship

Awarded to a full-time undergraduate student enrolled in the food science major with a business and management focus and a minimum GPA of 2.5, who demonstrates financial need and interest in pursuing a career in the dairy or food science industries.

Nutritional Sciences Club

Students are encouraged to join and actively participate in the Nutritional Sciences Club. The goal of the club is to enhance the professional and personal development of students majoring in nutritional sciences by presenting opportunities to:

Dr, Wei Li, 139C G.M. Trout FSHN Building, (517) 355-8474, Ext. 186, .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), is faculty advisor for this club.

The Nutritional Sciences Club Officers are listed in the Nutritional_Sciences_2013-2014_HANDBOOK.pdf

An example of a previous meeting schedule for the Nutritional Sciences Club is:

August: Nutritional Sciences Club Orientation
September: Resume workshop
October: Study Abroad
November: Canned food drive; Resume deadline
January: Internships/Scholarships/meeting; Ice Cream Social
February: Graduate Student Speakers
March: Pharmaceutical sale representative
April: Elections meeting

You can contact one of the NSC officers or Dale Romsos for further information.

Other Student Organizations

The Pre-professional Society for Health Careers of Alpha Epsilon Delta is a student organization for all students interested in pursuing health care professions. Activities and programs include: medical school tours, social activities, instructions on the professional school application process, MCAT updates and interview techniques. Meetings are posted in the pre-professional display at the entrance to the lobby of the Natural Science Building. This is an excellent opportunity for nutritional sciences students to interact with other premed students on campus. Janae Currington (.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)), is the club adviser, as well as a premed adviser.

Volunteer Experience

It is important for premed students to secure long-term, in-depth work or volunteer experience where responsibility is being taken for the welfare of others (e.g. working in a hospital or clinic, being a scout leader, a camp counselor, providing day care for an individual who is developmentally disabled, volunteering in geriatric programs, etc.). These experiences not only let the student know that he/she is pursuing the correct career path, but they also let medical/dental schools know that the student is very serious about becoming a health care provider. The Michigan State University Service Learning Center, 27 Student Services Building, will assist preprofessional students in finding a volunteer experience at a hospital or clinic near campus, and the Student Employment Office, 110 Student Services Building, will assist you with health-related work experience.

Children, Youth and Family Programs Internships - MSU Extension Children, Youth and Family Programs (CYF) has challenging internship opportunities for students both on campus and throughout Michigan’s 83 county Extension Offices.

Opportunities are available for internships. This provides an excellent mechanism to explore various career options. Advisers will work with students to place them in the food industry, in community-education settings and in research laboratories, for example. Summers between the second and third years of college provide good opportunities for these internships. One search approach is to enter “Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship” (SURF) into Google and you will find thousands of potential opportunities. Students MUST plan early to arrange an internship. It usually takes 3 to 6 months lead time to arrange off-campus activities. Students interested in university credit for an internship may enroll in HNF 494.

Off campus internships have included the following experiences:             

Work Experience

Faculty in human nutrition often hire undergraduate students to work in their laboratories.  Opportunities are available sporadically, so again students must plan early and be somewhat flexible.  Contact individual faculty members to express interest.  Spartan Trak at www.csp.msu.edu provides a listing of on campus part-time jobs.

Department Aide Program

This program in food science and human nutrition is available to provide opportunities for mature, accomplished undergraduate students to assist FSHN faculty in teaching a professional course.  Please contact your academic adviser for further details if you have interest in this experience.

120 semester credits required for graduation

University Requirements in Integrative Studies

Total Credits: 29

All of the following courses:
CourseCredit
IAH – Arts & Humanities IAH 201-210 (choice) 4
IAH – Arts & Humanities IAH 211-241 (choice) 4
ISS – Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences ISS 200-level 4
ISS – Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences ISS 300 level 4
*Alternative Track to ISB and ISP (Total credits in Integrative Studies in Biological and Physical Sciences) 9
Tier I Writing WRA 110-150 (choice) 4

Tier II Writing is completed in Professional Courses with HNF 464 and FSC 455

 

*Students enrolled in the Nutritional Sciences major complete an alternative track to Integrative Studies in Biological and Physical Sciences with CEM 141 or 151, 161, 162, and PSL 310 or 431, fulfilled in the major.

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College of Agriculture and Natural Resources Requirements

 

One of the following (3 credits):
EC 201  - Introduction to Microeconomics

3

EC 201  - Introduction to Macroeconomics 3

Mathematics requirement: met by Department Core Requirements

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Major Requirements

Professional Courses

Credits: 21-23

CourseCredit
Complete all of the following courses (19 credits):  
FSC 211 -  Principles of Food Science 3
FSC 455 – Food and Nutrition Laboratory 3
HNF 260 – Principles of Human Nutrition 3
HNF 461 – Advanced Human Nutrition:  Carbohydrates, Lipids & Proteins 3
HNF 462 - Advanced Human Nutrition:  Vitamins and Minerals 3
HNF 464 – Nutrition in the Prevention and Treatment of Disease 4
Complete one of the following courses (2-4 credits):
HNF 375 - Community Nutrition

2

HNF 406 - Sociocultural Aspects of Food 3
HNF 471 - Medical Nutrition Therapy I 4

 Supporting Discipline Courses

Credits: 42-46

Complete the following courses:
CourseCredit
CEM 141 – General Chemistry or 4
CEM 151 – General and Descriptive Chemistry or 4
CEM 181H – Honors Chemistry I 4
   
CEM 142 – General and Inorganic Chemistry or 3
CEM 152 – Principles of Chemistry or 3
CEM 182H – Honors Chemistry II 3
   
CEM 161 – Chemistry Laboratory I or 1
CEM 185H – Honors Chemistry Laboratory I 2
   
CEM 162 – Chemistry Laboratory II or 1
CEM 186H – Honors Chemistry Laboratory II 2
   
CEM 251 – Organic Chemistry I 3
CEM 252 – Organic Chemistry II 3
CEM 255 – Organic Chemistry Laboratory 2
BS 161 – Cells and Molecules 3
BS I71  – Cells and Molecules Biology Laboratory 2
PHY 231 – Introductory Physics I 3
PHY 232 – Introductory Physics II 3
PHY 251 – Introductory Physics Laboratory I 1
PHY 252 – Introductory Physics Laboratory II 1
MMG 301 – Introductory Microbiology 3
MMG 302 – Introductory Microbiology Laboratory 1
   
BMB 401 – Comprehensive Biochemistry or 4
BMB 461 – Advanced Biochemistry I and 3
BMB 462 – Advanced Biochemistry II  
PSL 310 - Physiology for Pre-Health Professionals or
4
PSL 431 – Human Physiology I and 3
PSL 432 – Human Physiology II 3

Complete one (with PSL 431/432) or two (with PSL 310) of the following courses:

Credits: 3-8

CourseCredit
ANTR 350 – Human Gross Anatomy for Pre-Health Professionals 3
CEM 262 – Quantitative Analysis 3
MMG 409 – Eukaryotic Cell Biology 3
PHM 350 – Introductory Human Pharmacology 3
ZOL 341 – Fundamental Genetics 4
ZOL 408 – Histology 4

Select one of the following options (A or B)

Credits: 6-7

Option A:
CourseCredit
MTH 124 – Survey of Calculus I and 3
One of the following courses:  
MTH 126 – Survey of Calculus II 3
STT 201 – Statistical Methods 4
STT 231 – Statistics for Scientists 3
STT 421 – Statistics I 3
Option B:
CourseCredit
MTH 132 – Calculus I and 3
One of the following courses:  
MTH 133 – Calculus II 4
STT 201 – Statistical Methods 4
STT 231 – Statistics for Scientists 3
STT 421 – Statistics I 3

Several scholarship awards are available to currently enrolled graduate students in Food Science and Human Nutrition. Applications are available in Spring and are awarded in the next academic year.

J. Robert Brunner Fund for Food Science and Human Nutrition Research
Award available for Ph.D. 1/2 time assistantship in food processing or analytical research.

Chenoweth Award in Dietetics and Human Nutrition
Award for a dietetics student accepted into a Dietetic Internship Program or to a graduate student in human nutrition or medical-related program.

Dr. Lawrence E. and Violet I. Dawson Professional Development Endowment Fund
Graduate teaching assistantships for graduate students in food science. 

FSHN Graduate Endowment in Honor of Dawson, Harmon and LeVeille
Award to a graduate student in FSHN with demonstrated teaching proficiency, creativity and zeal.

LeRoy and Dorothy Dugan Food Chemistry Fellowship Endowment
Award to a U.S. graduate student(s) with research in the field of lipid chemistry.

Beth and Holly Fryer Endowed Scholarship
Award for an undergraduate student in food technology and management or a graduate student in human nutrition. Minimum GPA of 3.2.

Gerber Endowment Fund in Pediatric Nutrition and Food Science
Awarded to PhD graduate students in nutrition or food science actively engaged in research relevant to nutrition and food science with emphasis on pediatrics who demonstrate academic excellence. Must provide a statement of how your research relates to nutrition and food science with an emphasis on pediatrics.

The Max Gonzenbach Fund for Student Mentoring and Research
Award to a graduate student in FSHN with research project emphasis on “enhanced understanding of the associations between dairy-based foods, nutrition and health.”

LeeAnn B. Goodwin Endowed Graduate Research Fellowship
Research fellowships awarded to graduate students with research in newly emerging areas of nutrition.

H.A.M.M. Scholarship
Award for a graduate student enrolled in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition. Preference given to graduate students studying food service management.

John Harvey Kellogg Fellowship for Human Health and Nutrition Research
Competitive application process to award graduate assistantships for Ph.D. students in Nutrition.

Erland Kondrup Fellowship
Fellowship to graduate student(s) in FSHN with interest in dairy processing or dairy chemistry, to enhance professional growth.

Olaf and Clarice Mickelsen Human Nutrition Endowed Fellowship
Funds to support a graduate student in FSHN majoring in Human Nutrition

Lois Gordon Ridley Endowed Scholarships/Fellowships
Award to a FSHN graduate student. Preference for a student with financial need.

Dale R. Romsos Endowed Fund for Nutrition Research
Funds for support of graduate students conducting human nutrition research

Rachel A. Schemmel Graduate Student Endowed Research Scholarship
Award to a nutrition graduate student in FSHN or food science graduate student with a BS degree in nutrition or dietetics. Must complete one semester and submit approved research proposal or have current publication.

Stiver Endowed Fellowship
Awarded to a graduate student in FSHN with preference for financial need.

Professional Organizations

Many scholarships awards are available for graduate students in Food Science and Human Nutrition through associated professional organizations. Please check the individual websites for application information and dates available.

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
Several scholarships for students enrolled in an advanced degree program. Must be a U.S. citizen and intend to pursue a career in the field of dietetics. Additional information can be found at: http://www.eatright.org/CADE/content.aspx?id=7934&terms=scholarship

American Society for Nutrition
Awards for graduate students in nutrition programs. Additional information available at: http://www.nutrition.org/about-asn/awards/

Institute of Food Technologists
Nationally competitive awards available for food science graduate students with research programs in the area of food science/technology. Additional information available at: http://www.ift.org/cms/?pid=1001243.

Graduate students in Food Science and Human Nutrition may be able to obtain financial assistance from various sources:

Graduate Research or Teaching Assistantships

Assistantships are offered to U.S. and International students, both new and continuing,  based on excellent academic credentials and demonstration of interest in the area of research being investigated (GRA), or suitable knowledge in the course being taught (TA).  Assistantships are available only to graduate students who are actively pursuing degree programs.  Stipends, tuition waiver, and other benefits are determined by the University in compliance with the TA contract (found at http://www.hr.msu.edu/documents/contracts/GEU2011-2015.pdf) and the Graduate Students Rights and Responsibilities, http://splife.studentlife.msu.edu/graduate-student-rights-and-responsibilities.  More information on GRAs can be found at http://grad.msu.edu/assistantships/.

Department Awards

All applicants admitted to our graduate program are automatically considered for departmental assistantships, as well as scholarships and awards, which are assigned on a competitive basis. Applications should be received before January 15 to receive optimum consideration for departmental financial aid. Departmental assistantships are assigned for a one-year period and some may be renewable. Complete details of the financial support will be disclosed in discussions between the major adviser and the admitted applicant.

College of Agriculture and Natural Resources Awards

The college offers support through several fellowships and assistantship opportunities. Contact your adviser or a member of the CANR Graduate Committee or visit http://www.canr.msu.edu/graduate/.

University Funded Awards

University and college support is available for graduate students.  Fellowships include the University Distinguished Fellowships and University Enrichment Fellowships, Doctoral Completion Fellowships, and Special Fellowship programs to encourage activities such as teaching.  Funding is also available to enhance research projects and for travel.  Information on these awards is available through the Graduate School website, http://grad.msu.edu/funding/.

Financial Aid

US citizens and eligible non-citizens may qualify for financial aid, such as federal loans and need-based grants.  Information is available from the financial aid office: www.finaid.msu.edu/grad.asp.

International Student Financial Assistance

Office for International Students and Scholars
103 International Center
(517) 353-1720
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
http://www.oiss.msu.edu/students_financial.php

Financial assistance is also available to underrepresented minorities. Information is available from:

The Office of Diversity and Pluralism
College of Agriculture and Natural Resources
(517) 432-1349
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
http://odp.anr.msu.edu/

Alliances for Graduate Education and the Professoriate
The Graduate School
(517) 353-3220
www.grad.msu.edu/agep/.htm

Graduate Admission Requirements

Students admitted into our graduate program have at least a 3.0 GPA in undergraduate work or an appropriate MS program; Competitive Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores (50th percentile for verbal and quantitative, and 3.5 or above for analytical). Letters of recommendation and previous work experience are also weighed in the application review process. If an applicant meets our academic guidelines, one professor in FSHN must agree to act as major adviser for the student to be admitted. Therefore, not all qualified applicants can be admitted. Because of a recent change in policy, outstanding candidates may apply directly for the PhD program if they have obtained a BS degree. Decisions about direct admission into the PhD program will be made by the Graduate Affairs Committee.

What You Need To Know Before You Apply

Decisions regarding acceptance is made following consideration of the applicant’s academic record, experience, personal qualifications and proposed program of study.  Admission to Michigan State University graduate programs is open to all candidates on the basis of: 1) academic preparation and ability and 2) availability of financial resources, laboratory facilities and faculty with willingness and space to take additional students in the desired area of study.

Admission is open without regard to race, color, sex, religion, creed, national origin, political persuasion, sexual preference, marital status, handicap, age, or (in the case of U.S. citizens or permanent residents) financial needs.

Please note: We have a limited number of openings for students. Before filling out the applications and paying the application fees, it may be to your advantage to contact faculty members in your specific area of interest to determine if there is a faculty member available who has an opening and is willing to take you into their group. Faculty contact information and areas of interest are available under research on our Web site.

Timing of Application

Application Procedures

  1. Application Materials
    Upload the following application materials directly to the MSU Office of Admissions website: Application for Admission to Graduate Study
    • Transcripts
    • Statement of Purpose (Your past, present, and future experience/plans in Food Science & Human Nutrition. Some information may be presented as a CV.)
    • GRE General Score
      (ETS codes: 1465 for MSU)
    • TOEFL Score (International Applicants)
      Additional Information:
    • We accept photocopies of test scores in order to review applications, but we must receive official scores for students who receive an offer of admission to be admitted..
    • International applicants from non-English speaking countries are required to take either the TOEFL in order to have their application reviewed. 
    • We must have official transcripts from every university or college that you have ever attended. International applicants must include official transcripts translated into English. Please send to the Food Science & Human Nutrition Department.
    • If graduated with a degree, we also need a certification of graduation or degree granting diploma.
    • Chinese students must obtain verification of transcripts and graduation certificates from the China Academic Degrees and Graduate Education Development Center (CDGDC).  Students should send copies of their documents along with payment to CDGDC.  The CDGDC verifies grades and degrees and then sends via carrier service directly to the FSHN Department.  Please have documents sent to:

      Michigan State University
      Trout Bldg., FSHN Department
      469 Wilson Rd. Room 106
      East Lansing MI 48824

      Please note that if you are admitted and have not received a degree granting transcript, you will also need to use this process again during your first semester at MSU.
  2. Recommendation Letters

    • The MSU application process will prompt you to provide names and email addresses of your letter writers.  The system will then send a request and link to them to upload a letter.
       
  3. Status of Application
    Check the status of your application to the graduate program. As soon as we receive your University Application and enter it into our database, a status page is created. The status page indicates what items we have received, and will also indicate a decision once it has been made.

The following codes are used to apply for graduate programs in FSHN:

College of Agriculture and Natural Resources
0354 Food Science M.S.
0355 Food Science Ph.D.
0474 Food Science/Environmental Toxicology Ph.D.
5272 Human Nutrition M.S.
5273 Human Nutrition Ph.D.

 **In completing the online application, use these guidelines  for your Academic and Personal statement**

International Applicants - We encourage international students to apply as early as possible because there is an extended waiting period for visa applications; preferably a year ahead of the semester they wish to enroll in. Click here for additional information

 

 

M.S. Graduate Forms:

Ph.D Graduate Forms

 

 

''1360 Anthony Hall

The Michigan State University Meat Laboratory is part of the animal science complex (Anthony Hall) renovated through the Animal Industry Initiative in 1995 through 1998.  This is a USDA-inspected teaching, research and outreach facility, which is managed by the Department of Animal Science and the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition. Laboratory activities support the teaching, research and outreach efforts of the faculty of these departments and others at MSU

The Meat Laboratory contains over 67,000 total square feet. Almost 18,000 square feet is dedicated to red meat and poultry slaughter and subsequent processing, including curing, cooking and equipment storage. The abattoir is designed to efficiently slaughter all major red meat and poultry species. It contains supporting refrigeration for chilling, cutting and further processing. The facility contains a sausage kitchen, which is equipped with all major processing equipment scaled down for laboratory-sized meat formulations. The kitchen is supported by appropriate refrigerated curing rooms, smokehouses capable of natural as well as liquid smoke applications and other pertinent cooking equipment.  

''

There is over 15,000 square feet dedicated for personnel and over 5,000 square feet dedicated to two classrooms, which have full access to carcasses/meat from the pilot facility. There are three research laboratories and support facilities dedicated to understanding, improvement of meat chemistry, muscle growth, meat quality and meat microbiology. 

More information on the Meat Lab can be located, here: http://www.fshn.msu.edu/meat_laboratory

Contact:

The Meat Lab                    
Food Science and Human Nutrition                    
Michigan State University                                 
3385D Anthony Hall                                         
East Lansing, MI  48824-1224                           
Phone: (517) 353-9773                         
Fax: (517) 432-0753                                          
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

                                  

Jennifer Dominguez , Facility Manager
Food Science and Human Nutrition
Michigan State University
1358 Anthony Hall
East Lansing, MI  48824-1224
Phone: (517) 353-9773
Fax: (517) 432-0753
E-mail:.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)[/email]

''

124G G.M. Trout FSHN Building

The Cereal Milling and Product Laboratory is a complete product development, analytical, research and applications facility of approximately 2,500 square feet.  The facility and operation has been supported, in part, by the cereal industry and the Michigan State Millers’ Association. The facility includes a walk-in cooler, four refrigerators and four freezers. Within the Cereal Milling and Product Laboratory, a milling room (temperature- and humidity-controlled) houses a wide range of milling equipment with a large glass window that allows operation observation away from the noise and flour dust generated during the milling process. A wide range of baking apparatus, rheological instruments and a food extruder are situated in a temperature- and humidity-controlled environment. The facility provides capability for producing a variety of baked, extruded and milled products, and for performing rheological and biochemical tests.

''

Contact:

Perry K.W. Ng, Facility Coordinator
Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition
Michigan State University
135C G.M. Trout FSHN Building
East Lansing, MI  48824-1224
Phone: (517) 353-9605
Fax: (517) 353-8963
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

''

1100 S. Anthony Hall

The Experimental Foods Laboratory is a 1,629-square-foot facility designed to meet teaching, research and outreach needs. Courses currently taught in the facility include Experimental Approaches to Food, The Art and Science of Food Preparation and Food Product Development. In addition to serving as an active teaching laboratory, this space is used for product testing, professional and consumer workshops, and food service/retail recipe development and testing. Ten kitchen units are included in this laboratory. Each unit is composed of a stainless steel sink with counter tops, a stove and appropriate kitchen utensils. Two of the units have 36-inch Viking Professional gas ranges with convection ovens. Four of the other eight units contain smooth top electric ranges with convention ovens. The other four units contain gas ranges with conventional ovens. There are five microwave ovens, two refrigerators (one home style and one three section commercial) and two freezers. Students have access to use of electronic balances, digital thermometers, handheld pH meters, thermostatically controlled electric fryers, blenders and food processors.

''

Adjacent to the Experimental Foods Laboratory is a 898-square-foot Food Demonstration Room that serves as a dining facility for the lab courses, workshops and focused food training conferences scheduled by faculty. The space can accommodate up to 50 people at conference tables. This area is equipped with up-to-date audiovisual equipment for presentations.

Contact:

''

Miriam Nettles, PhD, RD
Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition
Michigan State University
126 G.M. Trout FSHN Building
East Lansing, MI  48824
Phone: (517) 353-3404

Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

''124 G.M. Trout FSHN Building

The Food Processing Center was updated in 1993 through the generous support of the Kellogg Company and Gerber Companies Foundation, providing 4,000 square feet of flexible sanitary food processing capability. The center provides small-scale equipment and facilities available to instructors, students, researchers and to industry for the advancement of food processing technology with emphasis on fruits and vegetables.

''

Researchers utilize the center to conduct basic and applied research in various areas of processed food crops. The facility also provides a hands-on setting for undergraduate and graduate students to do small-scale processing, preparing them to meet the challenges of the food industry. Extension and outreach activities are provided to the Michigan growers, processors, related food crop processing industries and to relevant government agencies through projects completed in this facility.

''The midsize scale of the equipment provides an ideal environment to obtain scale-up data necessary before increasing production output at industrial locations. Projects using this facility deal with quality, storage, processing, marketing, distribution, safety and consumption of food crops.

The Food Processing Center is available for trial runs.  Fees will be quoted on a case-by-case basis.

Contact:

Kirk Dolan, Facility Coordinator
Food Science and Human Nutrition        
Trout, G.M., FSHN Building
469 Wilson Rd, Rm 135B        
East Lansing, MI  48824            
Phone: (517) 353-3333     
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

 

102 G. M. Trout FSHN Building''

The Food Sensory Laboratory is located on the first floor of the G. Malcolm Trout FSHN Building and is accessible from all other processing facilities in the department.  The Sensory Lab offers facilities for:

Food Sensory Areas

''Testing Area
The testing area allows for discriminative, descriptive, and consumer panel methodology and includes: 

Training Area
A training area suitable for profile or descriptive analysis panels is adjacent to the testing facilities and includes: 

Preparation Area
Between the booth areas is a preparation laboratory, which allows efficient preparation and presentation of samples.

Facilities and Equipment

Examples of Research Activities with a Sensory Component:

Michigan Bean Commission / Michigan Department of Agriculture & Rural Development. Assessment and utilization of novel food ingredients derived from Michigan dry edible beans: An innovative research and outreach project to enhance competitive advantage and long term sustainability for Michigan dry bean growers and shippers.

USDA - National Institute of Food and Agriculture. Production and supply side strategies for a local, Michigan grass-finished beef production system.

National Integrated Food Safety Initiative (NIFSI). An integrated approach to enhancing the safety of fresh-cut fruit and vegetable salads during processing, packaging, and distribution.

Specialty Crops Research Initiative (SCRI)-USDA. A total systems approach to specialty crop innovation: developing integrated systems to produce stem-free sweet cherries.

Defense Supply Center Philadelphia. Breakfast Components that Includes Eggs Part 1-3 Project No 2032.

International Life Sciences Institute Technical Committee on Food Microbiology. Inactivation of Salmonella on Raw Nuts Using Low Energy X Ray.

Kemira ChemSolutions. Inhibitory Effect of Provian (Sodium Lactate and Sodium Acetate Mixtures) on the growth of Listeria monocytogenes in Frankfurters Stored at 4, 7, or 100 degrees Celsius.

Multiple Company Testing Projects - beverages, restaurant foods, bakery products, etc.

Other research areas: Fresh cut fruits, vegetables, tart cherry concentrate and juice, watermelon juice, sugar-coated bean products, fermented cherry / apple blend ciders, chestnuts, various packaged products to extend shelf life and insure food safety.

 

Contact:
Janice Harte, Facility Coordinator
Food Science and Human Nutrition
Trout, G.M., FSHN Building
469 Wilson Rd, Rm 114
East Lansing, MI 48824
Phone: (517) 353-3326
Fax: (517) 353-8963
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

''

1120 S. Anthony Hall

The Dairy Foods Complex was fully renovated in 1997 as part of The Animal Industries Initiative (AII) through the State of Michigan. The revitalization project included modernization of all mechanical, electrical, lighting and communications systems within Anthony Hall, life safety modifications; building changes to create handicapper accommodations; and modernization of all research and teaching space. The Dairy Foods Complex houses the Processing Plant and Store, as well as Dairy Chemistry, Dairy Microbiology, Dairy/Food Rheology and Food Chemistry Teaching laboratories. 

   Dairy Processing Plant

''The Dairy Plant is equipped to process a variety of natural cheeses, cultured dairy products and ice cream in a state-of-the-art processing system.  Products are offered for sale to the public and to other MSU food service outlets through the MSU Dairy Store and the MSU Union Dairy Store and the MSU Union Dairy Store. Cheese is also sold via mail order and on-line. The maintenance of a small commercial scale processing facility along with the pilot scale facilities provides an environment that is effectively used as a research, extension and teaching tool. The department is committed to maintaining the facility with current technology.

 

Contacts:

John Partridge, Facility Coordinator 
MSU Dairy Plant
Anthony Hall
474 S Shaw Ln, Rm 2100B
East Lansing, MI  48824
Phone: (517) 353-3357
Fax: (517) 353-1676
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

 

John Engstrom, Facility Manager
MSU Dairy Plant
Anthony Hall
474 S Shaw Ln, Rm 1118A
East Lansing, MI  48824
Phone: (517) 355-7713
Fax: (517) 353-1676
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

''106 G.M. Trout FSHN Building

The Food Science and Human Nutrition Career Center was created in 2001 through the generous support of Pepsico Tropicana. This facility provides professional advising and placement activities for the department’s undergraduate academic programs – dietetics, food science and nutritional sciences. The facility provides office space for advising faculty and a reception area for student assistance. Two individual interview rooms provide facilities to conduct interview and placement activities for internships and career positions. The Career Center also provides space for students to access computers for researching internship and career opportunities as well as for advising and enrollment needs.

''

Contact:

FSHN Career Center
Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition
Trout, G.M., FSHN Building
469 Wilson Rd, Room 106
East Lansing, MI  48824

''

 

Lainie Buckles, Graduate Secretary
Phone: (517) 353-3323
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Cherie Nelson, Support Staff
Phone: (517) 353-3318
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Linda Summers, Dietetics Program Advising
Phone: (517) 353-3322
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

John Partridge, Food Science Program Advising
Phone: (517) 353-3320
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Jennifer Ekstrom, Nutritional Sciences Program Advising
Phone: (517) 353-3317
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

''

The Michigan meat packers and processors have a need for broad-based information in food science. They request assistance from the Extension specialist who disseminates information from research and teaching functions in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition. This is done in groups through programs and seminars held in Michigan. If necessary, this is done on an individual basis as time permits. Most all food facilities are regulated by food laws in both Michigan and the United States. The specialist serves as a liaison to the USDA and USDA inspectors in the state of Michigan as regulations are implemented. They also serves as a conduit and information source on new laws and science-based information helpful in keeping food products safe and free of pathogenic microorganisms. Additional responsibilities include working with the Michigan Department of Agriculture revising state regulations and implementing HACCP in the retail meat arena. The specialist also responds to consumer questions that request meat science expertise.

Contact:

Meat Lab, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition
Anthony Hall
474 S Shaw Ln, Rm 3385D
East Lansing, MI 48824
Phone: (517) 353-9773
Fax: (517) 432-0753

 

''

The Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition has partnered with MSU Extension (MSUE) and the National Food Safety and Toxicology Center (NFSTC) to create the MSU Food Safety Area of Expertise Team (MSU Food Safety AoE). The Food Safety AoE is a self-directed group composed of MSU faculty from the department (Bourquin, Booren, Dolan, Partridge, Occeña-Po and Weir-Pisano) and the NFSTC, as well as Extension educators from the counties. 

The Food Safety AoE has three working groups:

  1. Consumer Food Safety Education develops and disseminates research-based programs and resource materials on food safety for Michigan consumers; puts up food safety displays and engages in collaborative food safety initiatives with partners including NFSTC, the Michigan Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

  2. Professional Development conducts training programs for the food industry and MSUE staff, including Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs; pre-harvest food safety), Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP), Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs), and food safety programs for restaurants and retail food operations throughout the United States and internationally.
  3. Social Dimensions is interested on how consumers develop food safety perceptions, perceptions influencing consumer choices and how communication is used between consumers on food safety issues.
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    Additional food safety programs provide specific emphasis on the following programs:

Contact:''

Les Bourquin, Associate Professor
Food Science and Human Nutrition
G. M. Trout FSHN Building
469 Wilson Rd, Rm 139A
East Lansing, MI 48824
Phone: (517) 353-3329
Fax: (517) 353-8963
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Outreach efforts are directed to promote the economic growth and vitality of Michigan plant products producers and processors. Faculty focus on optimizing design of nutraceutical processing as well as value-added processing of asparagus, beans, and grape and blueberry by-products.

The department offers an annual short course certification program, Better Process Control School (BPCS). This USDA approved workshop offers intensive technical training to professionals in the processing industries. Topics covered include:

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Contact:

Kirk Dolan, Associate Professor
Food Science and Human Nutrition 
G.M. Trout FSHN Building
469 Wilson Rd, Room 135B
Phone: (517) 353-3333
Fax: (517) 353-8963
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

The Michigan State University Dairy Foods Complex (Link to facilities page) houses research and teaching laboratories as well as a small, state of the art process facility for milk and dairy foods. The faculty and staff of the Dairy Foods Complex are regularly involved as invited speakers or writers for educational programs and publications targeted to the consumer. Visitors to the observation deck of the complex may watch a self-guided multimedia presentation explaining the technology behind the processing of fluid milk, ice cream and cheese.

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Educational programming for the Michigan dairy industry

The following workshops and short courses are offered to the public/industry on an annual or biennial schedule. Similar programs are also available to individual companies on a contract basis.

One-day Introductory Workshops:

Two-Day Short Courses:

The MSU Dairy Foods Complex is equipped with a wide variety of process and analytical equipment that is made available for technology transfer and product/process development on a contract basis. The Extension dairy specialist and the dairy Foods complex staff act as liaisons between the MSU research community and the dairy foods industry, including regulatory agencies.

Contact:''

John Partridge, Associate Professor
Food Science and Human Nutrition
Anthony Hall, South
474 S Shaw Lane, Room 2100B
Phone: (517) 353-3320
Fax: (517) 353-1676
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

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Outreach programs in community nutrition are designed to teach community members how to develop healthy lifestyles, particularly in improving nutrition and promoting physical activity. The long-range goal of these efforts is to improve knowledge and behavior in order to prevent lifestyle-related diseases and chronic health conditions, and to reduce the incidence and mortality rates of such diseases and conditions. Targeted health conditions may include overweight and obesity, diabetes and heart disease.

Current projects at Michigan State University that are focused on families with small children include:

The Infant Feeding Study (TIFS)

Several MSU departments have partnered with community programs to develop education for pregnant and new mothers enrolled in Medicaid in the State of Michigan. The curriculum seeks to integrate nutrition and responsive parenting to help these new mothers develop healthy infant feeding practices. Research has included both new mothers and health care providers (doctors, nurses, Women Infant & Children’s (WIC) division nutritionists and nutrition educators) in the development of the educational curriculum.

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Our goal is to improve the quality, safety, nutritional value and demand for meat, fruit, vegetable, dairy and cereal products. We are working to improve the efficiency of meat production by nutritional and hormonal optimization of muscle growth in meat-producing animals. We are studying the structural, compositional and metabolic basis for muscle function and their relationship to the ultimate quality of muscle as a food. We are working to expand the use of underutilized commodities, using by-products of the meat and dairy processing industries. For example, we are developing protein films using whey protein isolate and concentrates, an underutilized by-product of the cheese industry. Another focus is to determine how the biochemical and physical properties of foods influence their quality and safety.

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We are looking at the relationship between the biochemical properties of meat and cereal proteins and how these proteins function in processed meat products and based goods. We are studying the underlying mechanisms of protein gelation and emulsification, two functional properties critical in many food products. Several projects are underway in cooperation with the cherry industry in Michigan to develop new products, improve existing products and develop new uses for cherries. One project is looking at the antioxidant activities of selected cherry components. Much of this research will lead to expanded markets for Michigan agricultural products.

Participating Faculty:

Dolan, Kirk Harte, Janice Ng, Perry Ofoli, Robert Partridge, John Ustunol, Zeynep

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This is one of the major focus areas in the department with education, research and outreach activities conducted by a large number of our faculty. The area is strengthened considerably with close ties to the National Food Safety and Toxicology Center (NFSTC). In addition, there is an opportunity to obtain dual degrees in Food Science and Integrative Toxicology through MSU‘s Program in Environmental and Integrative Toxicological Sciences.

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Current faculty research emphases focus on agents that affect human and animal health including mycotoxins and other natural products, foodborne disease agents and their toxins, and a variety of nutritional factors. This is an active area of research and education with a significant capacity for career growth.

Participating Faculty:

Gangur, Venugopal Linz, John Marks, Bradley Pestka, James Ryser, Elliot Wu, Felicia

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The biochemical nutrition research program focuses on the utilization of molecular, cellular and physiological techniques to investigate nutrient function and metabolism in health and chronic disease prevention. Approaches ranging from the whole animal to cell culture are employed. Areas of emphases include nutrient bioavailability, vitamin A, Sphingolipid and zinc functions, phytochemicals and cancer prevention, and neuroendocrine regulation of energy metabolism.

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Participating Faculty:

Bourquin, Leslie Fenton, JeniferGardner, Elizabeth 

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The community nutrition emphasis of the human nutrition program at Michigan State University focuses on research and education in community settings. Emphasized are prevention of chronic diseases such as obesity, cancer and cardiovascular diseases, and nutritional imbalances due to inappropriate food consumption patterns or underlying socio-psychological factors. Research efforts are made to identify and assess nutritional risk factors and their predictors, to improve the efficacy of health promotion programs in various settings for diverse target populations, and to develop and evaluate appropriate interventions to improve the health of people at the local, state, national and international levels.

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Participating Faculty:

Alaimo, Katherine  Carlson, Joseph  Hamm, Michael  Hoerr, Sharon  Song, Won  Weatherspoon, Lorraine

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The Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition at Michigan State University offers outstanding educational programs that uniquely impact at the interface of the food and health delivery systems. Programs form a continuum between production agriculture and consumer food use.  Human nutrition graduate programs provide a strong biochemical research base with practical community-based applications.

The department has demonstrated leadership in integrating its program areas that provide faculty and students development opportunities through diverse transdisciplinary experiences. Implementation of a safe, wholesome and nutritious food supply is enhanced through interaction of faculty with private industry and governmental agencies. Our programs benefit through extensive collaborative interactions espoused within the environment at MSU — a multidimensional, research intensive, land-grant university.

The Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition offers graduate programs leading to a master’s of science degree and a doctoral degree in human nutrition under the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. Also offered are numerous opportunities for postdoctoral research.

Graduate applicants are expected to meet the academic background requirements of the program of his/her choice. Programs of study and research are flexible and designed to meet the needs and objectives of individual students. Emphasis is placed on a sound educational program to develop a high degree of professional competence in a scientific program area.

The candidate selects a graduate program, which emphasizes either biochemical or community-based research. The applicant is expected to have had courses in the following areas: organic and quantitative chemistry, biochemistry, physiology, mathematics and nutrition.

Masters Degree:

The master’s degree program in human nutrition includes research, coursework in advanced nutrition, statistics, seminars and appropriate selections from one or more of the following areas: anthropology, pathology, genetics, psychology, sociology, epidemiology, or family and child ecology.

Ph.D. Degree:

The doctoral program course and research programs are designed to develop the student’s scholarly potential. Major emphasis is placed upon the completion of original research, which should provide a significant contribution to knowledge.

Ph.D. Dual Major Graduate Program in Toxicology at MSU

In addition to the M.S. and Ph.D. in the Food Science and Human Nutrition Department, students can also enter the joint HNF/Environmental Toxicology graduate program. If you are interested in toxicology graduate education and research related to the harmful health effects of environmental or other chemicals, you can enroll in this multidisciplinary dual-degree graduate program in Environmental and Integrative Toxicological Sciences (EITS).The EITS program is administered through MSU’s Center for Integrative Toxicology (CIT) and, in conjunction with our graduate program, offers outstanding training in basic biomedical science coupled with training and credentials in the discipline of toxicology that can open additional career opportunities.Before enrolling in this program, students must first be accepted for graduate study in a cooperating program such as Human Nutrition.

To find out more about this cooperating program, visit the CIT’s graduate programs in toxicology website, call 517-353-6469, or e-mail .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Research Areas and Faculty:

Biochemical and Molecular Nutrition

Community Nutrition

Contacts:

For specific questions and information on specific Human Nutrition research areas, please contact the following:

Biochemical and Molecular Nutrition Dr. Liz Gardner (517) 353-3354 E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Community Nutrition Dr. Won Song (517) 353-3332 Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) Dr. Katherine Alaimo ***currently on sabbatical (517) 353-3412 E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) 

Didactic Dietetics Training/International Studies Dr. Won Song (517) 353-3332 Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Dr. Lorraine Weatherspoon ***currently on sabbatical (517) 353-3328 E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

 

The Michigan State University Dietetic Internship Program will prepare its graduates to become dietitians in state-of-the-art practice, within diverse and challenging healthcare, food service and entrepreneurial positions.

Accreditation Status

The Dietetic Internship at MSU is currently granted accreditation by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) of The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 120 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000, Chicago, IL 60606-6995, (312) 899-4876.''

Program Options

The Dietetic Internship at Michigan State has a Community Education concentration while also meeting all of the required ACEND competencies for dietetic internships. The Dietetic Internship at MSU offers two tracks: 1) A certificate track for 11 full-time interns. 2) A part-time track for 3 interns who are concurrently employees of the state of Michigan WIC program. ** As of August, 2010 the MSU DI will no longer offer a track combining the DI with a Masters Degree.

The program provides supervised practice experiences necessary for qualified dietetics graduates to write the Registration Examination for Dietitians administered by the Commission on Dietetic Registration. The full-time program lasts approximately 10 months, including two weeks of vacation. The full-time internship begins in August and ends in June of the following year. The part-time WIC employee program lasts approximately 15 months, including one week of vacation. The part-time program begins in August and ends in November of the following year. Interns are expected to have reliable vehicles and considerable driving should be expected during the internship.

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The following links provide additional information:

Program_Guide_2015.pdf (for 2015-2016 internship year)

Dietetics_Internship_Handbook_2014-15.pdf

Pre-Select Process (for 2015-2016 internship year)

Part-Time WIC Component

Michigan State University (MSU), in collaboration with the WIC Division of the Michigan Department of Community Health has expanded Michigan State’s Dietetic Internship to include three part-time positions for Michigan WIC employees. The purpose of this cooperative effort is to provide career advancement opportunity for WIC staff in local, primarily rural, medically under-served areas.

Please click on these links for additional information:

Dietetic Internship - Part-time WIC Component (2014-2015)

Application Guidelines - Part-time WIC Component

Contact the dietetic internship director:

Gail Rogers, M.S., R.D.
Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition
Michigan State University
469 Wilson Road, room 125
East Lansing, MI 48824
Phone: (517) 353-3410
Fax: (517) 353-8963
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

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The Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition offers graduate programs leading to a Master of Science degree and a Doctor of Philosophy degree in Food Science under the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. Also offered are numerous opportunities for post-doctoral research.

Students who are admitted into the master’s and doctoral degree programs carry out research in either 1) food safety and toxicology or 2) food processing and quality enhancement. A student who is admitted to the graduate program in Food Science is expected to have general, quantitative and organic chemistry, and biochemistry. In addition, preparation for graduate work should include courses in the biological and agricultural sciences, mathematics, physics, nutrition, engineering or economics.

Masters Degree:

For the master’s degree in food science, the student may elect either Plan A (with thesis) or Plan B (coursework based). A total of 30 credits are required for the degree under Plan A or Plan B.

Ph.D. Degree:

The degree requirement includes 24 credits of dissertation research, two seminar courses and an appropriate selection of courses that support the Ph.D. research directions.

Ph.D. Dual Major Graduate Program in Toxicology at MSU

In addition to the M.S. and Ph.D. in the Food Science and Human Nutrition Department, students can also enter the joint Food Science/Environmental Toxicology graduate program. If you are interested in toxicology graduate education and research related to the harmful health effects of environmental or other chemicals, you can enroll in this multidisciplinary dual-degree graduate program in Environmental and Integrative Toxicological Sciences (EITS).The EITS program is administered through MSU’s Center for Integrative Toxicology (CIT) and, in conjunction with our graduate program, offers outstanding training in basic biomedical science coupled with training and credentials in the discipline of toxicology that can open additional career opportunities.Before enrolling in this program, students must first be accepted for graduate study in a cooperating program such as Food Science.

To find out more about this cooperating program, call 517-353-6469, or e-mail .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Research Areas and Faculty:

Food Processing and Quality Enhancement

Food Safety and Toxicology

Contacts:

For questions and information on specific research areas in Food Science, please contact the following:

Food Processing and Quality Enhancement

Dr. Perry Ng, (517) 353-9605, .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Dr. Kirk Dolan, (517) 353-3333, .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Food Safety and Toxicology

Dr. James Pestka, (517) 353-1709, .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Dr. Elliot Ryser, (517) 353-3353, .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

 

What is Food Science?

Food science is a multidisciplinary field that applies disciplines such as chemistry, microbiology, engineering and nutrition to develop new food products and design new processes to improve the safety and quality of foods. Food scientists use cutting-edge technology to develop new foods, add value to raw food commodities and improve the quality and safety of existing food products. Food science is the science of food. Consider exploring food science through our introductory course: Principles of Food Science (FSC 211).

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Food Industry
The food industry is the world’s largest industry. This multi-billion dollar industry employs many thousands of food scientists. Graduates are employed by food and related industries, federal and state governments, and universities to work at the interface between the production and delivery of food. There are more positions available for food scientists than graduates to fill them. Food science is everywhere on the grocery shelves.

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Food Science at MSU
The Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree in food science at Michigan State University is nationally recognized by the Institute of Food Technologists. The undergraduate program in food science provides comprehensive preparation in the basic sciences including chemistry, biochemistry, microbiology and physics. Courses in the major apply the principles learned in the basic sciences to the study of food science in courses such as food chemistry, food safety and microbiology, food engineering, food processing technologies and nutrition. In addition to the core program, students in food science select at least one concentration or interdisciplinary emphasis area to enhance the depth and breadth of their program. Food science offers flexibility!

Select from these links for more information:

Degree Requirements Professional Opportunities
Concentrations Food Science Club
Specialization in Food Processing and Technology Internships
Course Descriptions Apply to MSU
Scholarships Financial Aid
Student Activities

Contact the advisor:

Dr. John Partridge
Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition
G. M. Trout FSHN Building
469 Wilson Road, Rm 106D
East Lansing, MI 48824
Phone: (517) 353-3320
Fax: (517) 353-8963
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
MSU students:  Reserve an appointment through the online Advisors Calendar.

The Nutritional Sciences major emphasizes intensive study in biological and physical sciences as a basis for understanding the science of nutrition and the relationships between nutrients and human health. Core course requirements focus on human nutrition with areas of study in energy metabolism, proteins, vitamins, minerals, community nutrition and diet in the prevention and treatment of diseases. Supporting discipline courses include biochemistry, biology, chemistry, physiology, microbiology, mathematics, and physics.

This major is designed to meet the admissions requirements of most colleges of medicine, dentistry and paramedical colleges while the student pursues a bachelor’s degree in a clinically related area. Refer to the Pre-Health Professional webpage for more specific information on how the MSU Nutritional Science courses correspond with typical professional school requirements.  The major also prepares students to enter graduate school programs in nutrition and other life sciences. Graduates in Nutritional Sciences qualify for positions in the food industry, corporate wellness and health promotion programs, public health programs, pharmaceutical sales and similar occupations.

Degree Requirements

Nutritional Sciences Handbook

Nutritional Sciences Club

Internships

Student Activities

Nutritional Sciences Minor

Other quick links:

Apply to MSU

Financial Aid

Scholarships

Course Descriptions

Contact an advisor:

Jennifer L. Ekstrom, PhD
Academic Advisor, Nutritional Sciences
Dept of Food Science & Human Nutrition
G. M. Trout FSHN Building
469 Wilson Road, Rm 106F
East Lansing, MI 48824
Phone: (517) 353-3317
Fax: (517) 432-5295; E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

MSU Students:  Reserve an appointment via the online Advisors Calendar.

''The undergraduate program in dietetics has been approved by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND), Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, as a Didactic Program in Dietetics that meets the minimum academic requirements for professionally qualified dietitians.

The dietetics program is designed so that supporting disciplines provide a knowledge-base prerequisite to the professional courses. Course offerings are sequenced to provide increasingly complex experiences that build upon previous knowledge. The student is expected to acquire approximately equal expertise in nutritional assessment and care and in foodservice management systems. Through the careful selection of elective courses, the student may develop special interests.

Eligibility for the Registration Examination for Dietitians is determined by verification of successful completion of an ACEND-accredited Didactic Program in Dietetics and one of the following supervised practice experiences: ACEND-accredited Dietetic Internship or ACEND-accredited Coordinated Program. Dietetic Registration, as administered by the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR), is a requirement of most positions for professional dietitians.

The MSU dietetics program is among the largest in the U.S. and one of the first established.

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Select from these links for more information:

Entry Requirement for Dietetics Major

What is Dietetics?

Degree Requirements

Dietetics Student Handbook

Curricular Special Options

Registered Dietitian

Course Descriptions

Student Activities

Scholarships

Apply to MSU

Financial Aid

Food and Nutrition Association

Contact the advisor:

Linda Summers, MS, RD
Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition
G. M. Trout FSHN Building
469 Wilson Road, room 106C
East Lansing, MI 48824
Phone: (517) 353-3322 Fax: (517) 432-5295
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Web page: www.msu.edu/~summer24
MSU students: Reserve an advising appointment via the online Advisors Calendar.

''Contributions to the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition are welcome and sincerely appreciated.

You may designate one of the endowment funds listed below or give an unrestricted gift.

MSU‘s online gift processing system is easy, fast, safe and cost-effective. Our credit card-based system eliminates postage, reduces paperwork and saves time. As a safety precaution for our donors, the online gift processing system authorizes your transactions in real-time. We do not record or keep your credit card information on site.

To contribute by credit card, click on the name of the fund you wish to make a contribution to. Click here to contribute by mail.

Food Science and Human Nutrition Unrestricted Gift- used as discretionary funding in support of department programs

Undergraduate Student Endowments

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Charles H. (Chuck) and Marjorie (Marge) Bagans Memorial Endowed Scholarship (A10906) – Award to a food science and human nutrition undergraduate student with demonstrated interest in the dairy sciences.

Chenoweth Award in Dietetics and Human Nutrition (A11296) – Award for a dietetic student accepted into a Dietetic Internship Program.
Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition Endowed Scholarships (AG061) – One award to an undergraduate student in Dietetics in honor of Annette Rachman. One award to an undergraduate student in Food Science in honor of Dr. Charles Stine.
Beth and Holly Fryer Endowed Scholarship (A11293) - Award to an undergraduate student in Food and Nutrition or a graduate student in Human Nutrition with minimum GPA of 3.2.

Future Leaders Mentoring Scholarship (A1122415) – Awarded to two students in Dietetics or Nutritional Sciences with GPA of 3.0 or above. Preference to students entering their sophomore year who are first generation college students with financial need as determined by federal guidelines. Students to be advised and mentored by the donor or designee.

Gonzenbach Fund for Student Mentoring and Research (A11225) – Award to a food science and human nutrition undergraduate or graduate student for mentoring and research in dairy-based foods.

P. Vincent Hegarty Food Science and Human Nutrition Quality in Education Fund (A11260) - Income to enhance quality of education for students in FSHN.

Andrew R. and Claudine Burkhart Jackson Dairy Food Science and Human Nutrition Scholarship (A11209) - Support for Product Development Team travel and an award to a sophomore or junior in FSHN with a minimum GPA of 3.0 and interest in dairy foods.

David and Mary Jessup Dietetic Internship Scholarship (A11226) - Award to a Dietetic senior with demonstrated service to the community and solid GPA.

Marilyn Mook Endowed Scholarship (A1129) – Award to a full-time undergraduate student in dietetics or nutritional sciences intending to pursue a career in human nutrition and foods. Preference for students experiencing financial difficulty.

 

Delton and Dianne Parks Scholarship (A10919) – Award to an undergraduate student enrolled in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, pursuing a career in food science with preference for students entering the field of dairy processing or production and demonstrating financial need.
Dale R. Romsos Endowed Fund for Nutrition Research (A112265) - Award to an undergraduate or graduate student conducting human nutrition research.
The Rachel A. Schemmel Endowed Lecture/Undergraduate Research Scholarship (A11295) – Award given to sophomores, juniors or seniors with a minimum GPA of 3.0 having an interest in laboratory research.
G. Malcolm Trout Undergraduate Scholarship Fund (A10903) – Awards given to undergraduate students enrolled full-time in any major in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition.

 

Graduate Student Endowments

J. Robert Brunner Fund for Food Science and Human Nutrition Research (A11201) - Support for visiting lectures in the area of Protein Chemistry and Milk Processing.

Dr. Jerry and Stella Cash Professional Development Endowment Fund (A11215) – Awards for graduate teaching assistantships for a food science graduate student and a nutrition graduate student interested in foodservice management.
Dr. Lawrence E. and Violet I. Dawson Professional Development Endowment Fund (A11218) – Funds support a graduate teaching assistantship for students demonstrating financial need.

Leroy and Dorothy Dugan Food Chemistry Fellowship Endowment (A11211) – Award to a food science graduate student with research specialization in the field of food chemistry. Food Science and Human Nutrition Graduate Endowment in Honor of Dawson, Harmon and Leveille (A11220) – Funds provided for financial assistance or professional development of a graduate student in food science and human nutrition with demonstrated excellence in a teaching assignment.

Gonzenbach Fund for Student Mentoring and Research (A11225) – Award to a food science and human nutrition undergraduate or graduate student for mentoring and research in dairy-based foods.

LeAnn B. Goodwin Endowed Graduate Research Fellowship (A11223) – Award for a graduate student in food science and human nutrition conducting research in a newly emerging area of nutrition.

H.A.M.M. Scholarship (Katherine Hart, Pearl Aldrich, Grace Miller, Jean McFadden) (A11297) – Award for a graduate student enrolled in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition with preference given to students studying foodservice management.

P. Vincent Hegarty Food Science and Human Nutrition Quality in Education Fund (A11260) - Income to enhance quality of education for students in FSHN.

Erlund Kondrup Fellowship (A11203) - Fellowship to a graduate student in FSHN with interest in dairy processing or dairy chemistry.

Olaf and Clarice Mickelsen Human Nutrition Endowed Fellowship (AG064) – Award to a human nutrition graduate student in food science and human nutrition.
Dale R. Romsos Endowed Fund for Nutrition Research (A112265) - Award to an undergraduate or graduate student conducting human nutrition research.

The Rachel A. Schemmel Graduate Student Endowed Research Scholarship (A11295) – Award to a graduate student in food science and human nutrition with a previous degree in nutrition or dietetics.

Stiver Endowed Fellowship (A11219) - Award to a graduate student in FSHN with preference for a student with financial need.

Career Center

Cereal Milling and Product Laboratory
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Dairy Foods Complex

MSU Dairy Store

Food Processing Center

''Food Sensory Laboratory

Experimental Foods Laboratory

Meat Laboratory

MSU Artisan Distilling Program

 

Since its beginning over 90 years ago, Extension in Michigan has focused on bringing knowledge-based educational programs to the people of the state to improve their lives and communities. Today, field agents supported by on-campus faculty and staff members are serving in every county, providing programs focusing on agriculture and natural resources; children, youth and families; and community and economic development.

''Outreach efforts in food science and human nutrition provide knowledge and educational programming to the citizens of Michigan. Current activities offer information to industry and consumers to assure a safe and healthy food supply and to apply principles of health and wellness to families and communities.

Faculty in Food Science and Human Nutrition also provide outreach efforts through the MSU Product Center for Agriculture and Natural Resources. Established in 2003, the Center helps entrepreneurs and established companies to develop and commercialize high value, consumer-responsive products and businesses in the agriculture and natural food sectors.

 

 

 

 

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Responsible Conduct of Research

Michigan State University has established a requirement for responsible conduct of research (RCR) training for all undergraduate students, graduate students, and post-doctoral personnel engaged in the conduct of research about the responsibilities of in proposing, conducting, and reporting on research, scholarship, and creative activities. Click on the links below for information specific to FSHN:

The recognized educational objectives of Michigan State University include, as equally important goals, the discovery of new knowledge through fundamental research and the dissemination of existing knowledge. The Food Science and Human Nutrition Department conducts research to meet these goals and to fulfill the mission of the MSU AgBioResearch.

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Our faculty’s targeted areas of research examine new theories and approaches to solve contemporary issues of food production, quality and safety, as well as nutrient function and applications to health and chronic disease prevention. In addition to investigative research, faculty apply their knowledge and skills to instructional courses, as well as provide mentoring environments for visiting faculty, research associates and students.

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Projects are funded through internal sources such as the MSU AgBioResearch, Families and Communities Together (FACT), the Vice President for Research and Graduate Studies and the Health and Biomedical Research Initiative. External funding agencies include the National Institute of Health, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as well as numerous industry partners.

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The Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition offers both Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degree programs in two areas:  Food Science and Human Nutrition.

The department also offers a Dietetic Internship Program that prepares our graduates to become Dietitians in state-of-the-art practice, within diverse and challenging healthcare, food service and entrepreneurial positions.

Requirements for our graduate program are listed in the FSHN Graduate Handbook 2013

 

Prospective Graduate Students:

 

Current Graduate Students:

For additional information, please contact:

Lainie Buckles, Graduate Studies Office
Dept of Food Science & Human Nutrition
G. M. Trout FSHN Building
469 Wilson Road, room 106
East Lansing, MI 48824
Phone: (517) 353-3323
Fax: (517) 432-5292
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

''The Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition offers Bachelor of Science degree programs in 3 areas: dietetics, food science, and nutritional sciences.

Please click on a link below to explore these programs.

Relevant links for undergraduate degree candidates:

Food Science Club

Nutritional Sciences Club

Food and Nutrition Association

Apply to MSU

MSU Course Descriptions

Financial Aid

Department Scholarships

For additional information or to schedule an appointment with an undergraduate advisor, please contact:

Career Center
Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition
G. M. Trout FSHN Building
469 Wilson Road, room 106
East Lansing, MI 48824
Phone: (517) 353-3318
Fax: (517) 432-5295

MSU students: Reserve an appointment online via the Advisors Calendar.

 

 

Welcome

Welcome to the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition at Michigan State University.  We invite you to explore our web site and discover our nationally recognized academic, research and outreach programs. Our department is home to 36 faculty, 51 graduate students and nearly 600 undergraduate students. Our faculty and staff are active in research to solve contemporary issues in food production, quality and safety, as well as nutrient function and applications to health and chronic disease prevention. We are committed to excellence and the application of knowledge and expertise in classrooms, laboratories and communities. Tour our updated research and educational facilities and do not forget to try the world-class ice cream and cheese available through our MSU Dairy Store!